amazon facebook_32 gplus_32 linkedin_32 pinterest_32 tumblr_32 twitter_32 website_32 youtube_32 email_32 rss_32

 The mission of the "Your Mark on the World Center" is to solve the world's biggest problems before 2045 by identifying and championing the work of experts who have created credible plans and programs to end them once and for all.
Crowdfunding for Social Good
Devin D. Thorpe
Devin Thorpe

Social Entrepreneurship

This category includes articles about social entrepreneurs, typically about businesses with a for-profit model with a social mission embedded into the fabric of the business.

Learn How to Build a Better Board For Your Nonprofit


Kate Hayes joined Echoing Green with a clean mission in mind: help nonprofits build better boards. Too many boards are untrained, lack diversity and aren’t fully engaged. She’s developed programs to help nonprofits and board candidates alike to be more effective.

Interview with Kate Hayes, the of Echoing Green.

The following is the pre-interview with Kate Hayes. Be sure to watch the recorded interview above.

What is the problem you solve and how do you solve it?

Nonprofit boards are ineffective – members do not reflect the communities they serve, they are not active enough in fundraising, and they are not focused on strategy. Only 16% of board members are under the age of 40; 80% of board members have received no training; and 65% of board members don’t think their fellow board members are engaged. At the same time, very few training programs exist, so we are stuck in the cycle of bad boards.

My goal was-and is- to re-imagine what board service looks like. Direct Impact is an experiential board leadership program which prepares exceptional young business leaders for high-impact nonprofit board service. We help individuals identify and unleash the skills, competencies, and qualities they need as leaders to be able to influence and impact people throughout their lives, both through board service and beyond. Through an intensive leadership development process, we are preparing them to change the game.

At the same time, I work with social entrepreneurs as they develop their own boards, and seek to bring ‘next practices’ to life in the boardroom.

A recent article by Kate Hayes:  https://ssir.org/articles/entry/a_roadmap_to_better_boards

More about Echoing Green:

Twitter: @echoinggreen

Facebook: facebook.com/echoinggreen

Website: www.echoinggreen.org

For over 30 years, Echoing Green has unleashed next-generation talent to solve the world’s biggest problems. These leaders, who spend their lives working with purpose, define their generations; they make society better.

Echoing Green continues to build a global community of emerging leaders – almost 800 and growing – who launched Teach For America, City Year, One Acre Fund, SKS Microfinance, and more. Whether it’s through our Fellowships or our other innovative leadership initiatives, like Direct Impact, we unleash unexpected potential by tracking down the best and the brightest leaders, bringing them together, and launching them on a path to success.

For-profit/Nonprofit: 501(c)3 Nonprofit

Revenue model: Echoing Green is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, and is funded philanthropically. The specific program I lead, Direct Impact, is a fee-for-service program, where individuals and/or corporations pay tuition for the programmatic experience.

Scale: Direct Impact is Echoing Green’s newest program, and was started three years ago. To date, we have graduated six cohorts of business leaders, for a total of over 50 graduates. The program is continuing to grow, with increasing demand from both individuals and corporations.

Kate Hayes
Photo Credit: Echoing Green

Kate Hayes’s bio:

Twitter: @kdahayes

Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/kathryndianehayes

Kate Hayes is the director of Direct Impact at Echoing Green. She oversees programming for business leaders who are dedicated to realizing their full potential as agents of social change. She leads retreats, workshops, and immersive site visits focused on leadership development, purpose, strategic governance, philanthropy, and social entrepreneurship. Prior to joining Echoing Green, she worked as Director of Evaluation and Program Impact in the national office of Minds Matter. While at Minds Matter, she led several new initiatives for engaging alumni, scaling the organization, and training 1,700 skills-based volunteers across the United States. Kate currently sits on the Executive Committee at the Northfield Mount Hermon School, where she serves as Vice President of the Alumni Council. Kate writes about leadership development and governance across the web, including in Forbes and SSIR. She holds a degree in Behavioral Neuroscience from Northeastern University.

I consider myself a hybrid between a social entrepreneur and intrapreneur. I joined Echoing Green to re-think the way we were working with business leaders, so in a sense, I am an intrapreneur. At the same time, I am working to solve a major challenge in the space, which is that nonprofit boards are extremely ineffective.


Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

How This Sandwich Shop Feeds 80 Nonprofits For Free

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

You can download an audio podcast here or subscribe via iTunes or Google Play.

Customers at Even Stevens, which promises to give a sandwich for each one it sells, may envision a kitchen in the back where employees make sandwiches for homeless people, but co-founder Sara Day, 28, explains it doesn’t work that way.

Day, the cause director for the 20-store chain operating in six states, says they scrapped the idea of making sandwiches before the company opened its first store in June of 2014.

The team decided against making sandwiches for two reasons.

First, they quickly recognized that making sandwiches at exactly the moment that nonprofit partners would want them would be impossibly difficult. The result of not doing so would be lots of wasted food.

The second problem is that making and delivering finished sandwiches would be too expensive. The normal margins on sandwiches aren’t big enough to allow the company to make two for the price of one. Customers wouldn’t be willing to pay the full retail price of two sandwiches to get just one—at least not often enough to make the business work.

Sara Day, Even Stevens

So, Day and the team came up with another plan. Each store selects four nonprofit partner organizations that it sponsors. The nonprofits are set up with accounts with the wholesale food supplier Sysco. Every time a customer makes an entrée purchase, Even Stevens donates $0.54 to the Sysco account of one of the nonprofit partners–enough to buy the ingredients for a sandwich.

While that may sound modest, Day says the downtown Salt Lake City store sells 15,000 sandwiches every month. Across the chain, the company is now producing 110,000 sandwiches every month. At that rate, the sandwich making firm is donating over $700,000 per year.

Kathy Cady, the co-coordinator for the Tucson Neighborhood Food Pantry, effuses over the support the pantry receives from Even Stevens. “Unfortunately, the population numbers for those in need seem to grow faster than our donations from other sources can keep up. Even Stevens donations have allowed us to provide quality foods to clients who may have had to go without. We are overjoyed to be able to supply fresh meats, non-perishable goods, fresh produce, and dairy all thanks to Even Stevens and their generosity.”

The model is also working well for the business, which Day reports is profitable. She notes that “mature stores,” those open for more than 24 months, generate operating margins of 15%.

Day was drawn to social entrepreneurship, she says, because she started college in 2008 as the Great Recession was beginning. She was appalled by what she calls the “incessant greed, fraud and quite frankly bullsh–” of the time.

“As a business major, I knew wanted to do something more and work for a company who cared more about people than just profits,” Day says.

“When I heard about the initial concept of Even Stevens, I knew it would be the perfect mix for my food experience, emerging degree in Business Administration and a passion for wanting to do something more than status quo at the time,” she adds.

More than a million donated sandwiches later, Day says, “I couldn’t even have dreamed—we’ve grown to over 80 nonprofit partnerships; we’re partnered with boys and girls clubs, senior centers, addiction recovery, domestic violence shelters–like really all over the place we are helping people.”

If you share my passion for doing good with your money, learn how you can become an impact investor with my online course, 25% off with this link.


Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

Your Mark on the World Changemakers of the Month for May 2018: NanaEfua Baidoo Afoh-Manin and Briana DeCuir

Congratulations to NanaEfua Baidoo Afoh-Manin and Briana DeCuir for being selected by Your Mark on the World readers as the Changemakers of the Month for May 2018. Both medical doctors, they are co-founders of the Shared Harvest Fund, which has developed a new model for helping graduates pay off their student loans.

We first told their story on Forbes. NanaEfua and Briana were joined in the founding group by a third African American medical doctor, Joanne Moreau.


The Shared Harvest Fund works like this: “debtfreelancers” who are people with student loans willing to volunteer for nonprofits find those opportunities on the Shared Harvest Fund Social Impact Job Board. Both the nonprofit and the debtfreelancers pay modest subscription fees to the Shared Harvest Fund. Additionally, sponsors and donors contribute to the fund. The funds pay down the student loans of the debtfreelancers.

The Shared Harvest Fund is raising money on Indiegogo to expand the number of people they can help from the first day. The Fund will be launched on June 19, 2018, Juneteenth, marking the celebration of the end of slavery in America.

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

Conserva Irrigation Brings Technology To Your Yard To Reduce Wasted Water


Fresh, clean water is one of the scarcest resources on the planet and much what we use to water our yards is wasted. Conserva Irrigation is employing technology to shut your system down when the soil contains enough moisture–and much more.

Founder and vice president, Russ Jundt, explains how the technology can reduce water usage by 40 to 60 percent. The systems work well for commercial and residential real estate in the U.S. and around the world.

The company, part of the Outdoor Living Brands, family of franchise companies is working to find new franchisees who want to be a part of saving this scarce resource.

Interview with Russ Jundt, the founder, vice president and brand leader of Conserva Irrigation.

The following is the pre-interview with Russ Jundt. Be sure to watch the recorded interview above.

What is the problem you solve and how do you solve it?

Russ Jundt found a simple solution to one of the world’s most overlooked environmental issues — the tremendous amount of water wasted by traditional sprinkler systems. Due to an outdated industry with a lack of technology, 1.5 billion gallons of water are wasted daily (just in the U.S.), making it the world’s most limited yet wasted resource. With the use of Conserva’s proprietary irrigation assessment process and water-efficient technology, the average homeowner conserves 33,000 gallons of water per MONTH, while saving up to 60% on their monthly water bill. And on the commercial side, the company has helped hundreds of Target stores conserve 36 million gallons of water over the past year. Conserva is now in 44+ markets across the U.S., with plans on expanding to countries and markets with water crises and shortages.

More about Conserva Irrigation :

Website: https://www.conservairrigation.com/conservation/

Conserva Irrigation is the very first national irrigation company that’s committed to conserving water — specifically, the 1.5 billion gallons of water that’s wasted daily through inefficient sprinkler systems. With less than 1% of the earth’s surface covered in usable fresh water and climate change limiting our access to clean drinking water, Conserva was created as a way to combat the tremendous amount of water wasted by traditional sprinkler systems, and conserve one of the earth’s most limited yet wasted resources, while drastically reducing water bills.

With Conserva’s proprietary irrigation assessment process and water-efficient technology, the average homeowner conserves 33,000 gallons of water per month, while saving 40-60% on their monthly water bill. And the company overall has conserved 100 million+ gallons of fresh water since its inception. With a presence in 44+ markets across the U.S., Conserva plans to expand its global footprint and bring its impact to countries and markets suffering from water shortages and crises.

For-profit/Nonprofit: For-profit

Revenue model: Conserva Irrigation is the first ever national landscape irrigation model.  It was founded solely on the principles of water conservation with the main goal of reducing the ridiculous amount of fresh water waste from sprinkler systems.  Revenue at the franchisor level is derived from standard franchising royalty fees while providing marketing, accounting, operational and business coaching services.

At the franchisee level revenue is generated by providing services to our residential and commercial customers for maintenance, repair and system upgrades.  The premise of Conserva Irrigation is to provide services that promote green lush, healthy turf and landscapes, while using substantially less fresh water. After Conserva upgrades an existing irrigation system it uses 40% – 60% less water than it did previously.  What a great business model – we get paid to help promote healthy plant material which cools the earth, replenishes oxygen, and reduces run-off, all the while saving hundreds of millions of gallons of water each year.

Scale: Conserva was founded in December of 2010 and opened its first beta site in the fall of 2011.  In 2013 it expanded its testing ground to other regions of the U.S. by opening additional pilot locations to explore regional idiosyncrasies in field practices and marketing.  In June of 2017 Conserva officially started franchising its model across the U.S. and in its first eleven months has opened up in 44 territories and continues to gain momentum. System sales in 2017 exceeded $4 million and are slated to double in 2018.

Russ Jundt
Photo Credit: Conserva Irrigation

Russ Jundt’s bio:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/russjundt/

Russ Jundt came up with the idea of Conserva after spending 10 years in the irrigation industry and witnessing the tremendous amount of water wasted by traditional sprinkler systems. After developing a proprietary irrigation assessment process and coupling it with water-efficient technology, he founded Conserva Irrigation in 2011. As a former franchisee of Mosquito Squad, Outdoor Living Brands’ mosquito elimination company, Russ was fascinated with the franchise business model and wanted to apply it to his irrigation company. Conserva is now the fifth outdoor home service franchise under the Outdoor Living Brands umbrella of concepts and the very first national irrigation company committed to water conservation. It’s Russ’ goal, through the creation and development of Conserva Irrigation, to educate and create behavioral change in the use of fresh water in landscape irrigation systems across the world.


Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

Stop Thinking Small! 5 Billion Low-Income People Represent A Huge Opportunity

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

Having covered social entrepreneurship for Forbes for nearly six years, one of the biggest issues I see in the community of change-makers is limited vision. The world’s most pressing problems—poverty, disease and climate change—are massive are require solutions that scale. It is time for social entrepreneurs to stop thinking small.

Most of the world’s population can’t afford to own a car. Current estimates are that there are just over a billion cars on the road. Even if we assume that most are owned by one car families and that many people who can afford a car don’t own one, we can quickly conclude that five billion people lack the economic resources even to own a Tata Nano.

While it is true that most of these five billion people have adequate food, water and shelter, they are not enjoying a lifestyle that most people in the developed world take for granted. And nearly a billion people in the world are living on less than $2 per day, aren’t sure where their next meal is coming from and/or lack access to safe, clean drinking water. More than two billion people lack a sanitary place to defecate.

Ann Cotton

The world’s problems are huge. Stop thinking small.

Your project or enterprise can scale or be replicated.

Today, there are at least 65 million girls who are not in school. Ann Cotton was a graduate student in Cambridge doing research into the problem in 1991.

She is one of the most inspiring change-makers I’ve interviewed over the past six years (among more than 900 people). She founded CAMFED, the Campaign for Female Education. She got her start visiting Zimbabwe where she had learned boys outnumbered girls in school by a ration of 7:1. She was repeatedly told that parents simply didn’t want their girls educated.

When she started talking to parents she found that they did want to educate their girls but couldn’t afford to have all their kids in school and so sent their boys and typically kept their girls at home.

Starting with a bake sale to send 32 girls to school. It worked. Ann could have congratulated herself for helping 32 girls get an education and proving that they could and should be educated but she didn’t stop. She saw that effort as a pilot program, a case study, a proof of concept to be replicated.

To date, CAMFED reports having provided 249,378 girls with scholarships and having supported schools in five countries that have been attended by millions of boys and girls.

Big problems represent huge opportunities.

Narayana Health is a cardiac health care provider in India. With almost 16,000 employees, 50 facilities and 6,888 beds, the system generated about $318 million in revenue last year—its first year as a public company.

Founder Dr. Devi Shetty says, “If a solution is not affordable, it is not a solution.” (See my interview with him here.)

By focusing relentlessly on cost, Narayana Health has made quality cardiac care accessible to hundreds of millions of people for whom it was not available when Dr. Shetty launched the enterprise 30 years ago.

Dr. Deviprasad Shetty

The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals target the elimination of extreme poverty by 2030. This represents both a challenge and an opportunity for social entrepreneurs who see opportunities in selling clean water, distributed clean energy, financial services, improved nutrition and improved farming techniques at affordable prices to the billions of people who want them.

As economic growth in the global north slows to low single digits the potential for rapid economic growth and the financial and business opportunities that underlie it may be greatest in countries with high proportions of low-income people.

Let’s start seeing and investing in opportunities to scale good.

If you share my passion for doing good with your money, learn how you can become an impact investor with my online course, 25% off with this link.


Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

This AI Tool Could Revolutionize Impact Investing

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

You can download an audio podcast here or subscribe via iTunes or Google Play.

David Shrier left MIT after adopting the school’s mission and applying it to his artificial intelligence startup, Distilled Analytics. He’s hoping to disrupt impact measurement for companies and investors alike with the company’s new product, Distilled Impact.

“MIT’s mission is to solve the world’s biggest problems through technology,” Shrier says. “We spun out of MIT to look at how can we apply the tools of data and analytics and AI to help address the world’s biggest problems.”

“Distilled Analytics is applying data science to critical issues of activating private capital to build a better world,” he says.

“I was inspired to follow this path when I woke up one day and realized I couldn’t explain to my young children Julia and Henry what daddy does for a living,” he says.

He left his prior employer with people he admits not liking to join MIT, where he spent five years. At Distilled Analytics, he’s built a team he likes, including MIT professors Sandy Pentland and Roberto Rigobon along with Alex Lipton, whom he describes as the “legendary Wall Street quant.”

David Shrier

Watch the full interview with Shrier in the video player at the top of this article.

“We want to create structural solutions to society-scale problems by using advanced analytics,” he says.

So, what does Distilled Impact do? In Shrier’s words: “Distilled IMPACT provides investors with objective, quantitative, 3rd-party-sourced (vs self-reported) AI-driven assessments of the non-financial impacts and risks of their investments.”

Using new computational social science from MIT called “social physics,” Distilled Impact analyzes vast amounts of public information to measure environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) data.

“With the advent of things like the Internet of Things and other ubiquitous data networks, we were able to come up with third-party, credible, quantitative data sources and new kinds of analytics that leverage artificial intelligence and machine learning to measure instead of guess,” Shrier says.

“The methodologies that we use are transparent,” he says. The dashboard provided by the platform gives scoring around the “E.S. and G. factors” that users can drill down on so they can see how the scoring was achieved.

Shrier challenges people to get more comfortable with data. He acknowledges that it feels a bit like eating oatmeal. “But we live in a world immersed in data and where our data is is out there and we need to understand better what our data is how it’s being used and what our rights are with respect to that data.”

The SAAS system is cloud-based. It is designed for institutional investors and family offices that seek both profits and impact.

One key point of distinction, Shrier notes, is that unlike other systems that pull data only on public companies, Distilled Analytics can provide data on 260 million companies, including many private ones.

Shrier notes that the system will save time for both investors and for company executives. The system doesn’t require the company to generate any new reports or data. The evaluation uses publicly available information.

Shrier, says his superpower is synthesis, his ability to take lots of complicated ideas and condense them into a new product or a new opportunity. Impact investors now have an opportunity to judge for themselves using Distilled Impact.

If you share my passion for doing good with your money, learn how you can become an impact investor with my online course, 25% off with this link.


Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

Busy Executive and Entrepreneur Makes Time To Give Back Personally


Michael Dash, founder and CEO of Parallel HR could use any number of excuses for not making time to give back. He doesn’t. Instead, he travels the world doing good.

Interview with Michael Dash, the CEO/President of Parallel HR Solutions, Inc.

The following is the pre-interview with Michael Dash. Be sure to watch the recorded interview above.

What is the problem you solve and how do you solve it?

At Parallel I help companies identify, attract and hire niche IT talent from around the country.  Personally, I have started an addiction support group called FATE – From Addict to Entrepreneur bringing addiction and recovery into the spotlight.   I am also a founding member of #Activation group which inspires others to be positive, authentic, passionate, empathetic and resilient people day in and day out.

Dash’s FATE Group on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/425718181199071/

More about Parallel HR Solutions, Inc. :

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ParallelHR/

Website: www.parallelhr.com; michaelgdash.com

In the fast moving world we live in, matching top technology, financial and executive talent with companies ever changing needs is no small feat. Understanding organizations specific hiring objectives and company culture is the key to attracting top talent in the market.

This is where Parallel HR’s approach to building strong partnerships with top cutting edge companies differentiates us from other staffing partners out there.

For-profit/Nonprofit: For-profit

Revenue model: fee for service

Michael Dash

Michael Dash’s bio:

Twitter: @mgdvip

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelgdash/

Michael Dash brings a heavy dose of motivation embedded in a message of hope for those looking to make a difference in their life’s work and the world. Michael Dash has been there, and done that. Despite dealing with demons that would have derailed the dreams of most, Michael carved out a successful career as a business owner and entrepreneur. Even while building up his businesses, he struggled with a gambling addiction, investments gone wrong, and partners working against him. While most would have thrown in the towel, Michael doubled down on what was working and used it as motivation to make a positive and lasting impact on his businesses, his relationships, and the world around him.

Today, with a new book on the horizon, he is sharing his story to inform and inspire entrepreneurs and professionals looking to find a balance while leveling up in business and in life.


Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

Engage The Youth You Hope To Serve

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

You can download an audio podcast here or subscribe via iTunes or Google Play.

The youth you hope to help as a social entrepreneur or nonprofit leader may be your most powerful tool for helping them. This message comes from a recent report published by the United Nations University called “Cradled by Conflict.”

The report’s author, Siobhan O’Neil, 39, points out that youth discussed in the report about kids who have been recruited or coerced into joining militant groups are vulnerable but also capable of helping to define and manage their own recovery.

O’Neil, the project lead for children and extreme violence at the U.N.-based think tank, says that studies show that when children are engaged in finding solutions, the solutions can be effective. As an example, she says that students in a high school experiencing violence were asked to help design a program to reduce violence in the schools. The result: violence dropped significantly within a year.

O’Neil says it’s about not seeing youth as “beneficiaries for programs, it’s about seeing them as partners.”

The tragic context for the lesson is the violence going on around the world, but particularly in Syria and Iraq with ISIS and in Nigeria with Boko Haram.

O’Neil visited with me about the report. You can watch our discussion in the video player at the top of the article.

Siobhan O’Neil

The report’s central message for social entrepreneurs and NGO leaders is that youth are as complex as adults and don’t all do things for one single reason. Most particularly, kids aren’t typically joining ISIS or Boko Haram for ideological reasons.

They are often victimized strategically by recruiters who prey on their youthful desire to rebel against their parents and to belong to something. O’Neil says that militant groups often provide “a readymade community, a readymade identity and a readymade sense of purpose.”

Thomas Kontogeorgos, section chief for disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) at the U.N., provided some funding and expertise for the report. He says, “DDR aims to contribute to security and to sustainable peace by reintegrating ex-combatants in their communities and to prevent recruitment of new combatants by stabilizing vulnerable communities.”

He worries that states are treating young ex-combatants from extremist groups less favorably from kids involved in other conflicts because they are afraid of the radical indoctrination.

Kontogeorgos says, “The Cradled by Conflict study, however, clearly showed that the ‘exceptionalism’ of violent extremism has no basis in evidence and that groups labeled as violent extremist or terrorist share many features with other armed groups. Particularly, children joining a group deemed violent extremists do so rarely based on ideology but based on a variety of intertwined motivations such as physical and food security, family and peer networks, financial incentives, coercion, status, and identity.”

O’Neil notes that there could be many children involved. One of the researchers asked ex-combatant youth about the number of children engaged with ISIS in Iraq and Syria. Some estimates were that as many as 75% of combatants were children.

While not all of the children are necessarily actively engaged in conflict, their proximity to it as cooks, guards or in other support capacities make them vulnerable potential victims and frequent witnesses to violence.

Furthermore, it is difficult to define recruitment practices as being voluntary or involuntary when the recruits wouldn’t legally be allowed to vote, drink alcohol or buy cigarettes in most developed countries.

Consider the case of Anar, not his real name. The Islamic State killed his father when he was 12. He became the primary breadwinner for the family. Five years after his father was killed by ISIS, he was recruited to be a cook for ISIS fighters; he agreed because they offered more money than he could make otherwise. It is difficult in each case to determine to what extent a child has a choice about joining a militant group.

Among all these challenges, social entrepreneurs and others serving at-risk youth can take from these tragic experiences, lessons that can help lead to greater success. First, recognize that the youth you serve can be partners with you in solving the problems you hope to address. Second, remember that youth are motivated by a broad range of facts and circumstances and that it may be unfair or impossible to attribute a choice to them at all.

If you share my passion for doing good with your money, learn how you can become an impact investor with my online course, 25% off with this link.


Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

Expert Shares Insights for Wise Philanthropy


Richard Marker has been advising philanthropists for 25 years. Today, he took time to share his insights with us! He not only shares some best practices for philanthropy he offers tips for nonprofits who seek money from them (hint: don’t waste your time building relationships with philanthropists who don’t have an interest in your cause!)

Interview with Richard Marker, the Co-principal/founder of Wise Philanthropy / Wise Philanthropy Institute.

The following is the pre-interview with Richard Marker. Be sure to watch the recorded interview above.

What is the problem you solve and how do you solve it?

We help philanthropists and foundations make wise and informed decisions about their philanthropy strategy – as educators, advisors, writers, speakers.

More about Wise Philanthropy / Wise Philanthropy Institute:

Twitter: @WisePhilan

Website: www.WisePhilanthropy.com

Wise Philanthropy is a boutique advisory company exclusively for funders, philanthropists, families, and foundations.  Our expertise is strategy, evaluation, and education. Typically our clients are in some transition, or facing questions about what to do next or how to do it better.  Many of our clients are families or family foundations dealing with succession or intra family challenges. We do not manage anyone’s investments or their administration and never accept a fundraising contract.  [The Institute is our educational arm which teaches the same market about core competencies in grantmaking including ethics, best practices, decision making, policies, and evaluation.]

For-profit/Nonprofit: For-profit

Revenue model: Project or Lecture Fee for service +  p.t. academic appointments

Scale: 2 partners in Wise Philanthropy – part of larger academic staff at University of Pennsylvania

Richard Marker’s bio:

Twitter: @rmarker

Linkedin: linkedin.com/m/richardmarker1

Richard Marker teaches philanthropists and foundations from around the world at Penn’s Center for High Impact Philanthropy.  He is also co-principal of Wise Philanthropy, a boutique strategy advisory firm. A long time thought leader and practitioner in the field, he has lectured in 39 countries and throughout the United States.  Recently his writings on “philanthro-ethics” have stimulated new thinking on the intersection of power, equity, and social justice in philanthropy practice.


Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

Your Mark on the World Changemaker of the Month for April 2018: Stephanie Bowers of Jake’s Diapers

Congratulations to Stephanie Bowers of Jake’s Diapers for becoming the reader’s pick for Your Mark on the World Changemaker of the Month for April 2018!

Stephanie joined me for a discussion about her 25 successful crowdfunding campaign on CaringCrowd (a Your Mark on the World sponsor). We originally shared her story on GoodCrowd.info.

Stephanie shared some of the secrets for her crowdfunding success. First, she noted that one key is the need to ask for what you need. No one is likely to give you what you want if you don’t ask. Her second key: persistence.

Her organization, Jake’s Diapers, provides diapers to mothers of babies and to seniors who need them, in the developing world. She notes that buying disposable diapers can require an impossible portion of a family’s income, sometimes forcing mothers to reuse disposable diapers. This practice jeopardizes the health of the babies who wear them. Jake’s Diapers provides diapers to people who are currently forced to choose between diapers and food.

A woman with several babies

Stephanie Bowers, Jake’s Diapers

Stephanie shared her story:

Stephanie Bowers believes no caregiver, near or far, should ever have to choose between food and diapers. In January of 2011, her life was changed forever when she found herself on a mission trip to Pachacutec, Peru. While there, she visited a childcare facility where she saw caregivers who loved the children very much, and were re-using disposable diapers because they had to choose between food & diapers. Inspired to help just those 15 babies, Jake’s Diapers has now impacted more than 7,000 lives in 20 countries.

You can download an audio podcast here or subscribe via iTunes or Google Play.

The episode on which we shared her story was sponsored by CaringCrowd, which is sponsored by Johnson & Johnson.

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!
Subscribe to news from YourMarkOnTheWorld.com
* = required field
Content I want: