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The mission of the Your Mark on the World Center is to solve the world's biggest problems before 2045 by identifying and championing the work of experts who have created credible plans and programs to end them once and for all.

Crowdfunding for Social Good
Devin D. Thorpe
Devin Thorpe

Philanthropy

This category includes stories about philanthropy, typically covering the generosity of individuals, families, groups of individuals and foundations (nonprofits primarily in the business of funding other nonprofits.

LGBTQ Clothing That Looks & Does Good

This is a guest post from Jillian Brooks who is a copywriter, comedian, and social entrepreneur.

It’s not every day you have the opportunity to impact the same community, in vastly different ways – simultaneously. However, Project Comfort aims to do just that, creating a business model based around community empowerment.

Pushing passed the Masculine-Male & Feminine-Female conventions of modern day clothing providers; Project Comfort offers apparel for a more diverse set of body types, individuals, and identities. That means that sizing is more standard, and styles androgynous. But the really cool part of the organization is that $10 from every item sold goes back to an established LGBTQ nonprofit, and the customer picks what goes where.

Jillian Brooks

Jillian Brooks

Project Comfort works directly with nonprofits operating in the LGBTQ community to provide regular micro financing and donation income. When an item is added to a customer’s cart, they are prompted to select a nonprofit from a provided list.

From there, selections are tallied and donations are made to the nonprofits at the end of each quarter. On June 30th, 2015, nearly $2,000 was donated to 5 different LGBTQ nonprofits as a result of Project Comfort customers.

Project Comfort operates using the model of a breakeven-business, meaning that the majority of revenue generated from sales goes directly toward the nonprofits selected by customers. With less than 1% profit netting back to Project Comfort for company development, the organization operates solely to make a difference.

As a woman-owned social enterprise, that is a sustainably operated organization, with the majority of our items made in the USA, Project Comfort is conscious about the community at large.

Connect:

www.ProjectComfortUSA.com
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook
#EqualPeriod #ClothingForEquality

Bio:

Jillian Brooks is a copywriter, comedian, and social entrepreneur living in New York City.

When Experts Volunteer, Good Happens

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

“I feel like we’ve stumbled on this incredibly obvious epiphany, when you give what you’re good at, you get better at it. You help others while helping yourself,” says Mark Horoszowski.

His epiphany led him to create Moving Worlds, an match-making site for expert volunteers–experteers.”

Summarizing the value proposition, Horoszowksi says, “Major development organizations have shared that behind access to capital, access to skills is the leading barrier to progress – this is called the ‘talent gap.’ Contributing the right skills at the right time can bridge holes to create short-term impact, and also help local staff develop their own skills to foster long-term sustainability and impact.”

“We’re proving that the right skills can catalyze the impact of social enterprises working in the field – helping them create a positive impact and create jobs in the process,” he adds.

By way of a clear example, Horoszowski offers, “Before applying for growth capital or a grant, and organization needs an accounting system. That’s a skills challenge, not a capital challenge, and an Experteer can help with just that.”

“The most important thing that people have is their brain, time, and passion. By giving all three, not only do people contribute their energy towards solving some of the world’s greatest challenges, but research shows they also return having learned new skills, feeling like they have more time, and feeling even more loved and passionate,” he concludes.

On Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 3:00 Eastern, Horoszowski will join me for a live discussion about Moving Worlds. Tune in here then to watch the interview live. Post questions in the comments below or tweet questions before the interview to @devindthorpe.

More about Moving Worlds:

Twitter : @Experteering

A matching site and global support team TISI NaN% that helps people volunteer their skills–Go Experteering–anytime and for any length of time, on their own or through corporate-sponsored programs.

Our mission is to address the global talent gap by connecting Experteers directly to social change organizations in the world that provide free accommodation and other local benefits in exchange for expertise.

Mark Horoszowski

Mark Horoszowski

Horoszowski’s bio:

Mark is co-founder and CEO of MovingWorlds.org, a global platform that connects people who want to travel and volunteer their expertise with social impact organizations around the globe. Since its launch in 2011, MovingWorlds.org has already helped unleash over 1.2 million dollars worth of professional skills to social enterprises around the world.

In his free time, Mark serves on the American Cancer Society ’s Nationwide Training Team and Co-chairs its Nationwide Volunteer Leadership Advisory Team.

Number Of Polio Cases Globally Drops To 1 Per Week; How Do We Get To Zero?

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

The polio virus is in its death throes.

While it has been infinitely more difficult than the optimists hoped it would be 30 years ago, those who said polio couldn’t be eradicated will soon be proven wrong.

In the mid 1980s, there were about 350,000 to 400,000 cases of polio each year around the world, despite the disease having been effectively eradicated throughout the developed world.

In 2014, there were just 359 cases of polio, reflecting a 99.9 percent reduction over 30 years. On average, that number reflected a rate of about seven cases per week. So far, in 2015, the average number of cases per week has dropped to just barely above 1.

We are, however, now in the heat of summer in much of the world, including in Pakistan and Afghanistan where the disease remains active. Polio thrives in the summer months and the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, led by Rotary International and its partners the World Health Organization (WHO), UNICEF, the Centers for Disease Control with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, is working feverishly to prevent any spread of the disease.

Dr. Hamid Jafari of the WHO praises Rotary’s leadership in the effort to end polio, “The world is closer than ever before to eradicating polio, thanks to the tremendous efforts of Rotarians worldwide. A lasting polio-free world will be Rotary’s gift to all future generations. No child need ever be paralysed by this terrible disease.”

Jafari notes that the work is not yet done, adding, “But to achieve ultimate success, we need the ongoing support of all Rotarians, to push the effort across the finish line.”

Despite the progress, there are a variety of important questions that remain in trying to understand how this virus will be eradicated once and for all.

A recent outbreak of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus in Madagascar with eight reported cases so far, demonstrates the challenge. As immunization rates fall in countries where the disease has not been a threat in years, rare cases of vaccine-derived polio can spread. A shift away from the oral polio vaccine to the injected inactivated vaccine used in the developed world for more than a generation appears to be key. Making the switch isn’t going to be easy.

On Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 11:00 AM Eastern, Dr. Jafari and his colleague Dr. John Sever, the Vice Chair of Rotary International’s PolioPlus Program, will join me for a live discussion about the efforts to finally put an end to polio in 2015. Tune in here then to watch the interview live. Post questions in the comments below or tweet questions before the interview to @devindthorpe.

More about the World Health Organization:

The Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) is spearheaded by national governments, Rotary International, the World Health Organization (WHO), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and UNICEF, and supported by partners such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Since its launch in 1988, the GPEI has reduced the number of polio cases by 99%, from 350,000 annual cases in more than 125 endemic countries. to 3 endemic countries in 2015.

More about Rotary International:

Rotary brings together a global network of volunteer leaders dedicated to tackling the world’s most pressing humanitarian challenges. Rotary connects 1.2 million members of more than 34,000 Rotary clubs in over 200 countries and geographical areas. Their work improves lives at both the local and international levels, from helping families in need in their own communities to working toward a polio-free world. In 1988, Rotary was joined by the WHO, UNICEF and the CDC to launch the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

Hamid Jafari, WHO

Hamid Jafari, WHO

Jafari’s bio:

Dr. Jafari is currently the Director, Global Polio Eradication Operations and Research at WHO, Headquarters, Geneva. Before this appointment in March 2012, Dr. Jafari served as the Project Manager of World Health Organization’s National Polio Surveillance Project in India (2007-2012). As Project Manager of NPSP, he was the main technical advisor to the Government of India in the implementation of the nation’s large scale polio eradication, measles control and routine immunization activities and directed WHO’s extensive network of more than 2000 field staff.

Before his assignment in India, Dr. Jafari served as Director of the Global Immunization Division at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA. He has also served as the Medical Officer for Polio Eradication in the Regional Office of WHO for Eastern Mediterranean on assignment from CDC.

Dr. Jafari obtained his MBBS degree from Sind Medical College, Karachi University. He completed his residency training in Pediatrics at Dartmouth Medical School and his Pediatric Infectious Disease fellowship training at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. He has been certified by the American Board of Pediatrics in the sub-specialty of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. Dr. Jafari also completed a research fellowship at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Jafari has published over 80 scientific papers and book chapters on polio eradication and other vaccine-preventable diseases.

John Sever

John Sever

Sever’s bio:

Dr. John L. Sever is Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Immunology, Microbiology and Tropical Medicine at the George Washington University, Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Previously he served as Chief of Infectious Diseases Research, National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. He now serves on the Institutional Review Boards of the Pediatric Central IRB of the National Cancer Institute, NIH, The HQ US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command IRB and the Chesapeake IRB.

He received a B.A. degree from the University of Chicago, and B.S., M.S., M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Northwestern University. Dr. Sever has taught at the medical schools of Northwestern, Georgetown, and the George Washington Universities. He has been a medical advisor or consultant for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the March of Dimes, and Boy Scouts and has published over 600 scientific papers. He has been president of several medical research societies and has served on the editorial boards of several medical research journals.

A Rotarian since 1964, he has served Rotary as Club President, District Governor, Assembly Instructor, Legislative Council Member, Committee Member and Chairman. A long-term member of the 3-H and Programs Committee of The Rotary Foundation, Dr. Sever has monitored and advised on the development of Rotary’s PolioPlus Program, and has visited numerous projects to help assess the impact of Rotary’s support. As the Vice Chair of the International PolioPlus Committee, Dr. Sever not only helps to develop implementation policies but also articulates Rotary’s support for global polio eradication. As a member of the United States Rotary Polio Eradication Advocacy Task Force he has testified before the U.S. Congress in support of funding for polio eradication. He has also met with many Senators and Representatives to support international polio immunization programs. He has represented Rotary at meetings of WHO, UNICEF and the CDC. He is actively involved in Rotary Programs for Safe Blood and HIV/AIDS in India and Africa.

Nurse Seeks End To Infant And Maternal Mortality

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

When Arlene Samen was invited to meet with the Dalai Lama, she couldn’t imagine how it would change her life. Ultimately, she left her position as a nurse as the University of Utah School of Medicine to found One Heart World Wide, an organization that works to end infant and maternal mortality.

One Heart World Wide is making remarkable progress. After a temporary effort with great success in Tibet, Samen moved the organization to Mexico and now Nepal.

Samen says she’s learned a few lessons over the years and summarizes them as follows:

  1. I believe it is “relationships that save lives”, that by working together with others we can serve so many more.
  2. No matter what you face in life, never give up.
  3. The ripple effect knows no boundaries.

On Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 2:00 Eastern, Samen will join me for a live discussion about her remarkable work to end maternal deaths. Tune in here then to watch the interview live. Post questions in the comments below or tweet questions before the interview to @devindthorpe.

More about One Heart World Wide:

Twitter : @oneheartww

One Heart World Wide is a non profit organization empowering communities to save the lives of mothers and newborns during childbirth in the most remote areas of the world. We work within existing health infrastructures to prevent maternal and newborn deaths by promoting safe clean deliveries, training community health workers, and upgrading existing health posts to meet national standards of care for birthing centers.Through an elegantly simple approach of training and equipping the right people in the right way, One Heart saves lives efficiently, sustainably, and cost effectively. As the “Network of Safety” is culturally adapted for the people by the people, these systemic changes have a ripple affect, that saves lives now and into future. We deliver scalable solutions, safe pregnancies, and we deliver results.

Arlene Samen

Arlene Samen

Samen’s bio:

Twitter: @arlenesamen

Arlene Samen, has been a Nurse Practitioner in Maternal Fetal Medicine for over 33 years. In 2004, she left behind her clinical practice at the University of Utah School of Medicine to dedicate her life to serving pregnant women living int he most vulnerable conditions int he most remote places of the world. In her travels she learned about the plight of pregnant women and newborns in Tibet, where one out of ten newborn babies died due to preventable causes. She organized a fact-finding mission to understand the local traditions, religious and cultural beliefs of women giving birth. Arlene spent over ten years in Tibet working and living side by side with the local government to bring a safe motherhood project to women who were poor, uneducated, and living in the most remote areas on the roof of the world. She brought the “Network of Safety” model to women who face death in order to give life. In 2009, One Heart World-Wide brought its life saving model to remote villages in Nepal, the Copper Canyon in Mexico, and deep into the amazon jungle in Ecuador where few dared to go. To date over 60,000 women have been touched by the “Network of Safety”. She has endured political uprisings, being held at gunpoint, the SARS epidemic,and earthquakes to make sure women had a safe clean delivery. No matter what the challenges she faced, she followed the Dalai Lama’s advise to never give up. Arlene has received many awards, including Unsung Heroes for Acts of Compassion in 2001, the Soroptpmist Women Making a Difference Award, CNN Hero, and the Stevie Awards “Women helping Women.” She has been a presenter at TEDxSF, BIF10, and Catalyst Creativ amongst being a guest lecturer at Standford and UCSF.

UN Says We Can End Extreme Poverty, Hunger, Global Warming and Gender Bias By 2030

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

At the outset of the current millennium, the United Nations led an effort to set a group of goals to be achieved by 2015.

UN Secretary-General reported in 2014, that “the MDGs have made a profound difference in people’s lives. Global poverty has been halved five years ahead of the 2015 timeframe. Ninety per cent of children in developing regions now enjoy primary education, and disparities between boys and girls in enrolment have narrowed. Remarkable gains have also been made in the fight against malaria and tuberculosis, along with improvements in all health indicators. The likelihood of a child dying before age five has been nearly cut in half over the last two decades. That means that about 17,000 children are saved every day. We also met the target of halving the proportion of people who lack access to improved sources of water.”

Today, the world is looking forward to what we can accomplish over the next 15 years. The UN has established the Global Goals for Sustainable Development.

Amina Mohammed is Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Special Adviser on Post-2015 Development Planning.

Mohammed notes, “The sustainable development agenda addresses the root causes of poverty, inequalities and environmental degradation. It looks at the links between the social, economic and environmental agendas, and it presents more opportunities than the MDGs, which largely focused on the symptoms only.”

In an effort to broaden the impact of the U.N.’s efforts, she says, “The sustainable development agenda looks at the links between the social, environmental and economic agendas so it presents more opportunities than the MDGs, which focused purely on the social agenda.”

She notes that the new goals are not simply updated outcomes for the old goals, but that the UN is seeking to incorporate all that has been learned. “The sustainable development goals will continue the unfinished business of the MDGs, build on their lessons learned and go well beyond to address new and emerging challenges. Sustainable development is a universal agenda that applies to all people, in all countries and will leave no one behind.”

She adds that the Secretary-General said it best in his Synthesis Report, “The Road to Dignity by 2030: We must transform our economies, our environment, and our societies. We must change old mindsets, behaviors, and destructive patterns. All in pursuit of international peace and stability.”

On Friday, July 10, 2015 at 2:00 Eastern, Mohammed will join me for a live discussion about the new goals. Tune in here then to watch the interview live. Post questions in the comments below or tweet questions before the interview to @devindthorpe.

More about the United Nations:

Twitter: @UN

The United Nations is an international organization founded in 1945. It is currently made up of 193 Member States. The mission and work of the United Nations are guided by the purposes and principles contained in its founding Charter.

Mohammed’s bio:

Twitter: @AminaJMohammed

Amina J. Mohammed of Nigeria is the Secretary-General’s Special Adviser on Post-2015 Development Planning.

Ms. Mohammed was previously Senior Special Assistant to the President of Nigeria on the Millennium Development Goals after serving three Presidents over a period of six years. In 2005 she was charged with the coordination of the debt relief funds ($1 billion per annum) towards the achievement of Millennium Development Goals in Nigeria. From 2002-2005, Ms. Mohammed served as coordinator of the Task Force on Gender and Education for the United Nations Millennium Project.

Can You Make A Difference And A Profit? Estee Lauder Does

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

The Estée Lauder Companies, working through its MAC’s VIVA GLAM Lipstick, has become one of the leading funders in the fight against HIV/AIDS around the world, donating over $350 million total over 20 years reaching over $40 million per year recently.

Nancy Mahon, Senior Vice President, Global Philanthropy and Corporate Citizenship, explains the company’s passion for working so diligently to end AIDS, “We can only end AIDS if we test and treat everyone at risk of and actually infected with HIV. As only half of the people in the world who need HIV testing and treatment can get it, and funding for the epidemic is declining… we desperately need corporation’s business acumen and resources — including the ability to market and sell ideas — to tackle the world’s biggest problems, including ending AIDS.”

“The people behind many corporations are incredibly skilled at defining and efficiently solving many of the key business and resourcing issues, which also stand in the way of issues like equitable access to medical care.,” she continues.

“While science has now made it possible to end AIDS, it’ll only become a reality if we get a realistic and achievable business plan in place,” she concludes.

On Friday, July 10, 2015 at 1:00 Eastern, Mahon will return to my show here to talk about measuring return on investment for The Estée Lauder Companies in leading the fight against AIDS. Tune in here then to watch the interview live. Post questions in the comments below or tweet questions before the interview to @devindthorpe.

More about The Mac AIDS Fund:

Twitter: @macaidsfund

The MAC AIDS Fund (MAF), the heart and soul of MAC Cosmetics, was established in 1994 to support men, women and children affected by HIV/AIDS globally. MAF is a pioneer in HIV/AIDS funding, providing financial support to organizations working with underserved regions and populations. Recently recognized by Funders Concerned About AIDS as the top corporate giver in the arena, MAF is committed to addressing the link between poverty and HIV/AIDS by supporting diverse organizations around the world that provide a wide range of services to people living with HIV/AIDS. To date, MAF has raised more than $340 million (U.S.) exclusively through the sale of MAC’s VIVA GLAM Lipstick and Lipglass donating 100 percent of the sale price to fight HIV/AIDS. For more information, visit www.macaidsfund.org.

Mahon’s bio:

Twitter: @nancy_mahon

Nancy is Senior Vice President, Global Philanthropy and Corporate Citizenship, for The Estée Lauder Companies and Global Executive Director of the M·A·C AIDS Fund. In this role, she is responsible for Estée Lauder’s global corporate citizenship strategy, encompassing all philanthropic, cause-marketing, employee engagement, and product donation programs. Nancy also oversees the strategic direction and day- to-day operation of the M·A·C AIDS Fund. Currently, the Fund gives away $44 million annually throughout the world, particularly in the 72 countries in which M·A·C has affiliates.

In December 2011, Nancy was appointed as the Chair of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA). PACHA provides advice and recommendations to the President and the Secretary of Health and Human Services on programs and policies intended to promote effective prevention of HIV disease, and to advance research on HIV disease and AIDS.

Prior to joining M·A·C in June 2006, Nancy was Executive Director of God’s Love We Deliver (GLWD), the nation’s oldest and largest provider of life-sustaining nutritional support services for people living with HIV/AIDS, cancer and other serious illnesses.

Nancy is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale University and New York University’s School of Law, where she was an editor of the Law Review. She and her partner reside in New York City with their two children.

FB Heron Foundation Leads Foundations Toward 100 Percent Impact Investment

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

When people hear about impact investing, a light goes on. People immediately begin to see the potential. Once they do, they often assume that foundations must be doing the bulk of impact investing. In fact, relatively few are actively doing it.

The FB Heron Foundation has made a bold, public commitment to move 100 percent of its assets to impact investments by the end of 2017.

In her President’s letter issued last month, Clara Miller wrote, “In 2014, we continued to push forward on our core operating principle that “all investing is impact investing,” meaning that we believe that all investments (spanning the range of debt, equity, cooperative shares, warrants, and hybrid instruments) have social as well as financial repercussions. These social and financial repercussions can be positive or negative and vary over time. Bidden or not, intentional or unintentional, all of the enterprises that we invest in have impact that goes well beyond a financial return to an individual investor.”

On Thursday, July 2, 2015 at 2:00 Eastern, Miller will join me for a live discussion about the Foundation’s remarkable commitment to deploy its investment capital 100 percent toward its mission. Tune in here then to watch the interview live. Post questions in the comments below or tweet questions before the interview to @devindthorpe.

More about the FB Heron Foundation:

Twitter: @HeronFdn

The mission of the FB Heron Foundation is to help people & communities help themselves prosper, especially those that are economically disadvantaged. Heron is looking for ways to help rebalance the economy so that it ensures opportunity for all, which is a critical responsibility not only of philanthropy and government, but of business and investors. Heron invests in enterprises as if people matter.

Heron is uniquely investing all its assets for mission. Its funding is tax-status agnostic (for-profits and nonprofits) and utilizes all forms of capital.

clara_miller-1940x1940

Clara Miller, President, FB Heron Foundation

Miller’s bio:

Twitter: @ClaraGMiller

Prior to assuming the FB Heron Foundation’s presidency in 2011, Miller was President and CEO of Nonprofit Finance Fund which she founded and ran from 1984 to 2011. NFF serves as a “philanthropic bank” for both social sector organizations and their funders, and has invested and managed more than $1.5 billion in financing for social sector organizations.

In addition to serving on The F. B. Heron Foundation’s board, Miller is on the boards of Family Independence Initiative, the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board, StoneCastle Financial Corp., and The Robert Sterling Clark Foundation. She is a member of the Social Investment Committee of the Kresge Foundation and the U.S. National Advisory Board to the G8 Social Impact Investment Task Force. In 2010 Miller became a member of the first Nonprofit Advisory Committee of the Financial Accounting Standards Board.

Miller was the inaugural laureate of the Prince’s Prize for Innovative Philanthropy awarded in 2014 by the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation and the Tocqueville Foundation-Institute of France. She was named to The NonProfit Times “Power and Influence Top 50” for the five years from 2006 through 2010 and received a Bellagio Residency in 2010 by The Rockefeller Foundation.

In 1996, Miller was appointed by President Clinton to the U.S. Treasury’s first Community Development Advisory Board for the then-newly-created Community Development Financial Institutions Fund. She later served as its Chair. She was a member of the Community Advisory Committee of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York for eight years, and she received the “Shining Star Award” in 2014 from New York City performance space PS122.

Not Dead, Not Retired, 91-Year-Old Veteran, Entrepreneur Gives Back

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

Jack Nadel has been doing business since the end of World War II. Most people his age, quite frankly, are dead and the rest are retired.

Nadel is passionate about sharing his collected wisdom with veterans and others who are working to start businesses. He has written a book, The Evolution of an Entrepreneur, that features 50 of his best business tips.

Nadel has made the book available to veterans at no charge.

He shared a few of his tips with me.

  1. Find a Need and Fill It: The first deal I made was based on one of the first tips I share in my book: Find a Need and Fill it. In 1946, the Chinese were looking to purchase navy blue woolen material, which did not exist. However, there was post War army olive drab material available, so I bought olive drab at war surplus, dyed it navy blue and sold it to the Chinese.
  2. Never Fear to Negotiate, Never Negotiate Out of Fear: Never fear to negotiate and never negotiate out of fear, an important tip for all entrepreneurs. We sold our company, Jack Nadel International, to a New York Conglomerate in 1968. In 1972, we bought it back on a leveraged buy out. The New York company wanted the property for more stock, while our negotiations had included the property for cash. I explained to them that I did not come to re-negotiate and if I did not get cash for the property, there was no deal. They were astounded that I took that hard of a position that I would walk away from the deal. It was good that I did, because I would have sold it for $90,000 in 1968 and in 2014, after collecting rent for all those years, I sold the property for $4.2 million dollars.
  3. Think Global, Start Local: It is very valuable to prove your concept by actually succeeding at it on a smaller scale, first. If you can test a concept by actually executing it on a local level, you will have proven your point. Financing will be much easier and you will have learned what really works. A perfect example was my years in the writing instrument business. We progressed the company from being a small distributor in Los Angeles, California, to being a worldwide successful manufacturer and distributor. So it pays to think global, and start local.

On Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 4:00 Eastern, Nadel will join me for a live discussion about his remarkable, never-ending career and his new book. Tune in here then to watch the interview live. Post questions in the comments below or tweet questions before the interview to @devindthorpe.

More about Jack Nadel:

Twitter: @jacknadel

Jack Nadel’s mission is to help educate and train entrepreneurs and pass on what he has learned with succeeding generations. Through the creation of written and video learning materials via JNJ Publishing LLC, Nadel pursues his mission by sharing insights from his seven successful decades in business to provide the knowledge people need to start a business with or without a formal education. His materials feature The Nadel Method, a simple five-step process that was developed for entrepreneurs out of proven principles to create new businesses, while dramatically reducing the risk of failure. He is rooted in the belief that by evolving more entrepreneurs and helping them prosper, we will also help to sustain our middle class and the economy.

Nadel’s bio:

Jack Nadel has been an international entrepreneur for nearly seven decades—and has made a healthy profit every single one of those years. He founded, acquired, and operated more than a dozen companies worldwide that produced hundreds of new products, thousands of jobs, and millions of dollars in profits, including Jack Nadel International, a global leader in the specialty advertising and marketing industry. Each one of his business transactions has been an adventure he’s loved.

From this broad and solid foundation of experience, Nadel authored a number of popular books including his latest book, The Evolution of an Entrepreneur, winner of five Global Ebook Awards including three Gold Awards for Best in Business, Leadership and Careers/Employment. All were written with the purpose of assisting entrepreneurs with attaining greater business success.

In addition to his commercial enterprises and writing career, Nadel has lectured at several colleges and universities, developed his own targeted thinking methodology for entrepreneurs called The Nadel Method, and for several years hosted his own television show, Out of the Box with Jack Nadel. Though insisting that he has retired, at age 91 Nadel—a decorated WWII veteran—continues to share his expertise and wisdom mentoring future business leaders and entrepreneurs, including through regular article contributions to The Huffington Post.

Jack Nadel is a happy man who leads a robust life, savoring every moment. He lives with his wife Julie in Santa Barbara, CA, and also enjoys actively supporting their ongoing philanthropic efforts through The Nadel Foundation and local community involvement.

Lululemon CEO Helps Nonprofit Give Gladys In Nicaragua New Home

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

Lululemon (Nasdaq: LULU) CEO Laurent Potdevin recently joined with other employees of the apparel firm to build something completely different: a house.

Working with the nonprofit organization Giveback Homes, Potdevin helped fund the construction a home for a needy family in Nicaragua.

He shared his experience with me:

In the process of selling my home in Manhattan Beach, I was introduced to Giveback Homes through my real estate agents, Brigitte Pratt and Colleen Cole. They are both Giveback Homes Realtors and informed me that they would be donating from the transaction of selling my home to build a home for a family in Nicaragua.

I asked how much they were planning on donating and matched their donation. Between both of our donations we were able to build an entire home for a deserving family in Central America.

One of my favorite things about Giveback Homes is that they work to make sure their Realtors and clients feel a connection with the people they are helping. With every home built, the Realtors who donated to make that home possible receive a summary and photos of the family they helped and in some cases, the Realtors will join Giveback Homes team members to physically build the home.

The home we built was for Gladys and her family. Gladys was abandoned as a child. She’s now married with two children and works as a tortilla maker, her husband sells bread on the street and their combined monthly income is $200.

Before we built Gladys’ first home, she was living in a makeshift shack with dirt floors and walls made of wood scraps. When it rained, the floors in the house would turn to mud. It was my honor to help build her dream home; her first real home. Gladys is a hard worker, self-taught entrepreneur and a fighter. She fights every single day to give her children the life she wished she had, the life all children deserve; a safe place to call home and parents that love them.

I’m so thankful to my philanthropic real estate agents for introducing me to this wonderful organization. Buying and selling homes through these philanthropic agents is an easy sell in my opinion.

On Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 3:00 PM Eastern, Potdevin will join me for a live discussion of about his experiences helping to build this home. Tune in here then to watch the interview live. Post questions in the comments below or tweet questions before the interview to @devindthorpe.

More about Lululemon:

Twitter: @lululemon

lululemon athletica inc (NASDAQ: LULU) is a yoga-inspired athletic apparel com pay with products that create transformational experiences for people to live happy, healthy, fun lives. Setting the bar in technical fabrics and functional designs, lululemon works with yogis and athletes in local communities for continuous research and product feedback.

What We Do: Elevate the world from mediocrity to greatness. Our purpose gets us out of bed in the morning. Elevating the world from mediocrity to greatness is about holding ourselves and others to our highest possibility. This is our promise to the world.
How We Do It: Our products create transformational experiences for people to live happy, healthy, fun lives.
Our mission os how we live into our purpose. The products and transformational experiences we create aren’t limited to Luon–we design technical gear, throw kick-ass events and support our people with the intention of brining happiness, health and fun to our communities.

Lululemon on Youtube.

laurent_potdevin

Laurent Potdevin, CEO, Lululemon

Potdevin’s bio:

@laurentp1

Laurent Potdevin, CEO, brings more than 25 years in the retail industry to this role and a deep understanding of premium brands, athletic apparel, technical products, innovation and best-in-class customer experience.

Laurent previously served as President of TOMS Shoes, where he built a world-class management team, led global expansion, and broadened the company’s strong cultural identity. Prior to TOMS, Laurent spent five years as President and CEO, at Burton Snowboards where the business grew significantly under his leadership, expanding across product categories and creating international scale by always focusing on providing the best consumer experience.

Laurent first gained experience in premium, luxury brands through his tenure at LVMH where he identified the potential of the Berlutti footwear brand early on and then became Director of North American Operations for the company’s premier Louis Vuitton brand where he was integral in optimizing the brand’s North American supply chain.

As an avid snowboarder, you can find Mr. Potdevin carving it up on the mountain during the winter and on catching waves on his surfboard in the summer.

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Passionate Leader of UNFPA Kenya Battles Violence Against Women, FGM and Child Marriage

This post was originally produced for Forbes.

UNFPA Kenya is working hard with all partners to support the Government of Kenya and the First Lady of Kenya’s clarion call, ‘no woman should die giving life,’” explains UNFPA Representative to Kenya, Siddharth (Sid) Chatterjee.

Chatterjee explains the charge he received when he took on his new role just over a year ago, “The Executive Director of UNFPA Undersecretary General Dr Babatunde Osotimehin’s marching orders to me when taking up my role as UNFPA Kenya was, ‘support the Government to bring to an end the unacceptably high maternal deaths, end FGM and child marraige. Change the game.’”

The context, Chatterjee notes, is sobering. “Sexual and gender based violence [SGBV] continues to be a challenge in Kenya. According to Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS) in 2014, 41% of women have experienced violence. This is unacceptable. The Government of Kenya has made efforts to prevent and respond to violence by adopting policies and enacting legislation such as the sexual offences Act (2007), the FGM Act (2011) and the National Policy on Prevention and Response to GBV. A comprehensive response to SGBV needs to be multi-sectoral. These will include community education/dialogue, media campaign, advocacy forums with policy makers/legislators as well as psychosocial support, clinical, legal and security services.”

In the face of such a daunting challenge, Chatterjee strikes a distinctly optimistic tone, “Our world is home to 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24, and Dr Babatunde Osotimehin the Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) says, “Never before have there been so many young people. Never again is there likely to be such potential for economic and social progress.’”

“Kenya has one of the most youthful populations in the world with about 60 percent of the population aged below 24 years. A demographic dividend and through the countering violent extremism summit Kenya is going to host, she can change the narrative, by putting the spotlight on youth,” Chatterjee adds.

Chatterjee notes that achieving the country’s goals for women will require government leadership and collaboration among all development partners to create an integrated, long-term program that actively involves young people. “Let’s put youth at the center of the narrative. Kenya can serve as a model for transmuting its youth into a demographic dividend which other nations can emulate,” he says.

On Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 11:00 Eastern, Chatterjee will join me for a live discussion about the UNFPA efforts to end FGM, child marriage and sexual and gender-based violence in Kenya. Tune in here then to watch the interview live. Post questions in the comments below or tweet questions before the interview to @devindthorpe.

More about the UNFPA:

Twitter: @unfpaken

UNFPA is the lead UN agency for delivering a world where every pregnancy is wanted, every birth is safe, and every young person’s potential is fulfilled. The Executive Director of UNFPA globally is Dr Babatunde Osotimehin. UNFPA works in more than 150 countries and territories that are home to the vast majority of the world’s people.

In Kenya UNFPA is working with the Government of Kenya to:

  1. Reduce the unacceptably high maternal deaths.
  2. End harmful traditional practices like Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and child marriage.
  3. Advance the demographic dividend Kenya is blessed with by helping young people fulfill their potential and specifically invest in adolescent girls. Kenya has around 13.7 million young people out of a population size of nearly 43 million.

Chatterjee’s bio:

Twitter: @sidchat1

Siddharth Chatterjee (Sid) has been the UNFPA Representative to Kenya with effect from 10 April 2014.

Before joining UNFPA, he was the Chief Diplomat and Head of Strategic Partnerships and Resource Mobilization at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) based in Geneva since June 2011.

Before joining IFRC, he was Regional Director for the Middle East, Europe and Central Asian Republics at the United Nations Office for Project Services. He also served as Chief of Staff to the Special Representative of the Secretary General for the UN Mission in Iraq. He has served in leadership positions in UNICEF Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan(Darfur), Indonesia and with the UN Peace Keeping Operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Iraqi Kurdistan.

Before joining the UN in January 1997, he was a career officer in the Special Forces of the Indian Army.

He has written extensively on a range of humanitarian and social issues in a variety of journals such as CNN, Al Jazeera, Forbes, the Guardian, the Huffington Post, Reuters, the
Global Observatory, the Inter Press Service as well as some mainstream Indian journals. He is considered a strong advocate by the Global Polio Eradication Initiative to end the scourge of polio was a key note speaker on child soldiers at a TED x event in Spain.

He has a Master in Public Policy from the Woodrow Wilson School for Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, USA and a Bachelor of Sciences from the National Defense Academy in India.

Sid is married and they have a son.

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