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 The mission of the "Your Mark on the World Center" is to solve the world's biggest problems before 2045 by identifying and championing the work of experts who have created credible plans and programs to end them once and for all.
Crowdfunding for Social Good
Devin D. Thorpe
Devin Thorpe

Devin Thorpe

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How to Promote Your Cause Without Provoking Your Friends

Recently the Pew Research Center published a report showing that Americans are more politically divided than any time since they started tracking such data in 1994. Our country has survived greater divisions than we now see: abortion, civil rights, slavery, and federalism.

Increasingly, at least anecdotally, it appears that people are fed up with divisions and conflict. At some level both liberals and conservatives find themselves wanting to check out. My readers challenged me to write this article to find a path forward.

Tempting as it may be to check out, the things that divide Americans are important issues. Gun safety is a critical issue with 35,000 people dying from gun deaths every year. Those on the left would like to reduce the availability of guns. Those on the right see more guns as the key to safety. That’s a pretty big disagreement on a topic that matters.

Climate change threatens to destabilize the planet while some continue to argue that it isn’t anthropogenic or even that it isn’t happening at all. And this issue doesn’t just impact America; what we do here impacts the entire planet. We need a process by which we can talk about this without completely talking past one another.

The social safety net helps millions of Americans avoid death, despair or homelessness each year but millions of others slip through the cracks. One sure way to avoid finding solutions is to not talk about the problems.

To figure out how we can have a productive discussion that respects people more than policies I had to ask experts because I’m not good at this. I’m as prone to getting emotional as anyone else but like my readers, I want to find a way to have these conversations constructively.

Cheryl Snapp Conner, courtesy of Snapp Conner PR

Cheryl Snapp Conner, courtesy of Snapp Conner PR

Cheryl Snapp Conner, CEO of Snapp Conner PR and a regular Forbes contributor approaches communications professionally. She helps businesses formulate messaging in these fraught times with an eye toward building audiences and customers.

She suggests you start by highlighting your common ground and acknowledge them for the things you may admire about them: awareness, passion, civic engagement. Only then does she suggest delving into the areas of disagreement.

Dr. Paul Jenkins, courtesy of Live on Purpose

Dr. Paul Jenkins, courtesy of Live on Purpose

Dr. Paul Jenkins, a professional psychologist and author of Pathological Positivity offers this advice:  “I remind myself to put people before problems and values before valuables.”

He points out that we are all prone to confusing facts and opinions.

In the animated film Inside Out the characters are riding along on the train of thoughts and a stack of boxes containing facts and opinions get jostled and spills out on the floor. One of the characters is concerned about getting them all back into the right boxes, and another character comments that it doesn’t really matter because they all look alike anyway. Your position is an opinion.

Ouch.

Jenkins goes on to say that once we form an opinion, we are subject to confirmation bias, where we look for or even create evidence to support our opinion. I’ve seen this happen in my own life. Having no opinion about the color of the new carpet, asked for one I weakly offered one. Suddenly, I find myself offended by every other color option. Three minutes earlier, I couldn’t have cared less.

It is probably more important to be open than to be right,” he says.

Conner similarly suggests acknowledging the inherent biases we all have.

Even when you’re on your best behavior, others may push your buttons, perhaps making a personal attack. What to do then?

Nancy Hoole Taylor, licensed mental health counselor, says, “Do not internalize what others say. It is usually more of a reflection of who they are and not yourself.”

Or, as Jenkins puts it, “A sure fire way to escalate a situation is to take things personally.”

He spent over a dozen years doing child custody evaluations for the court. “In these nasty divorce situations where people really needed to discuss issues in the interest of the children, their engagement in the personal conflicts commonly derailed the discussions and they spent an enormous amount of time and energy fighting and being offended.”

Jenkins offers four ideas for de-escalation:

  1. Understand that person’s opinion is not about you, even if they say it is. It is about their own position and may include their perception of you. The troubling aspect here is that it sounds like they are describing you because the character in their story has your name, face, and social security number. But think about it, how well does that person really know you at your core? They really don’t, right? That means that the person they are railing against, hating, or disparaging is not you – it is a fictional character they have fabricated in their own mind. Don’t defend that person – you would hate them too.
  2. Use the social gifts of appreciation, connection, enlightenment, and elevation instead of defensiveness or retaliation.
  3. Remember that the person who has offended you is merely supporting their opinion. It is not their job to support your opinion, take care of you emotionally, or make you feel good about yourself – those things are your job.
  4. Use the strategic non-response.

Jenkins’ number four seems especially appropriate when the only response you can conceive involves language your mother wouldn’t approve.

Conner has her own approach. She notes that if someone else was personally attacked she’d come to their defense. “If it were about me, I’d maybe address it with humor–‘I may somewhat have resembled that’–and then move the focus to the issue at hand.”

She suggests making a kind or empathetic remark and then closing the discussion with a note of mutual agreement more positive than simply agreeing to disagree. She also agrees that in some cases, the best strategy is to disengage.

Therapist Judith S. Moore shares her strategy: “I express my love for the one disagreeing with me, letting them know we can still be friends.”

Jenkins offers this important reminder, “People are not wrong about how they feel or their opinions, their position is completely consistent with their current set of beliefs and perceptions. Let them be right about that. It’s also okay to not have an end to a discussion, to remain in the question and remember that opinions (including, and perhaps especially, your own) change.

The best advice of all, I think, was Jenkins’ parting wisdom: “Give up your need to be right.”

Key Job Skill for This Position: No Complaining About Rats and Roaches

“I look for a great communicator who can tell some of the most important stories in the world. Also, someone who won’t complain about staying in a $2-a-night room with rats and roaches,” New York Times columnist Nick Kristof summarized by email what he looks for in his annual “Win-a-Trip” contest.

Each year, Kristof of the New York Times holds a “Win-a-Trip” contest to find a student journalist to travel with him on a reporting trip. For 2017, he selected Aneri Pattani to accompany him to Liberia.

Pattani, 22, described her experience as a “one of the best” she’s had.

“Because I had the privilege of traveling with Nick, interviewing people and writing about my experiences for a global community of readers, I was able to chip away at my own ignorance and hopefully spread new knowledge to a few others, too.”

Nick Kristof and Aneri Pattani, courtesy of the New York Times

“Aneri was fabulous!” Kristof said.

“She’s a natural journalist who wrote compellingly about leprosy, African journalism and so much more–and her work is blessed with empathy and intelligence, even though she’s pecking away at full speed,” he explained.

Pattani, for her part, admits that the key lesson she learned in Liberia was “how little I know.”

She admitted feeling “guilty” when visiting a hospital that serves 75,000 people, knowing all the while that she had more medicine in her luggage–including some basic antibiotics and ibuprofen–than the entire hospital had.

She was inspired by Mae Azango, a Liberian journalist who wrote about female genital mutilation and was then forced into hiding.

That experience is exactly what Kristof hopes to accomplish with the “Win-a-Trip” program each year. “I want to help nurture the next generation of journalists who care about the issues that I consider important, and more broadly, I want to encourage young people to engage with issues of global health and poverty.”

For the sake of future applicants, I coaxed some advice out of Pattani. She noted that Kristof chooses all sorts of students, not just journalism students. Her primary advice, “Just be really authentic and explain why this is important to you in a personal way.”

See my past interviews with 2015 winner Austin Meyer and 2016 winner Cassidy McDonald.

As for this year’s winner, Kristof shared his final thoughts on Pattani’s performance: “She didn’t protest a room with rats!”

Aneri Pattani

Aneri Pattani

Pattani’s bio:

Twitter: @aneripattani

Aneri Pattani is a recent graduate of Northeastern University, where she studied journalism and Spanish. She spent part of the summer traveling with Nicholas Kristof to Liberia as the winner of his annual international reporting trip contest. After that, she spent 10 weeks working as a James Reston reporting fellow on the health/science desk of The New York Times. Her work has previously appeared in The Boston Globe, The Texas Tribune, CNBC and The Hartford Courant. When she’s not working, she enjoys learning new dance forms and cooking new types of food.

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

 

How I Will Stop Being a Jackass and Start Being Nice Instead

I have repeatedly confessed my guilt at being a jackass. I also think of myself as a humanitarian.

Yes, those two things are deeply at odds but they are not completely incompatible. You see, my career is entirely focused on helping to solve the world’s biggest problems: poverty, disease and climate change. I continue to work actively in several ways on each of these areas. I take them seriously.

Despite that, I think I inherited from my humanitarian father, either by close association or perhaps genetically, a tendency to dislike associating with people. Of course, I spend lots of time with people and love the time I spend with Gail, my wife. But there is little I hate worse than a reception where I am expected to chat up people I don’t know. This is true even though I have enjoyed meeting virtually everyone I’ve ever met at a reception.

What’s worse, is that I have long had a problem with all forms of customer service people, whether we are talking about “Peter” with the heavy Indian accent on the phone representing my airline or the order takers at McDonalds. Something in my mind always whispers, “They’re out to get you.”

(Yes, I am aware of the irony of treating badly people who earn minimum wage while advocating on behalf of low-income people and for social justice.)

Of course, this is absurd. For years, I have tried to address this by pledging not to be a jackass to customer service people. It remains my greatest personal challenge.

Today, I had an epiphany. Instead of trying not to be a jackass, I will instead try to be nice. Really nice.

I figure, that if I try to be in the top ten percent of customers as measured by niceness, then I’m not being a jackass. It also has the benefit of not requiring that I remind myself before every interaction that I have been a jackass in the past, which seems to have had the effect of reinforcing the idea that I am a jackass.

So, here’s my three-point plan to be nice to people, especially customer service people.

  1. Learn and remember names. It should be much easier to be kind to Peter than it is to the airline he represents. Peter didn’t lose my bag or foul up my reservation. The airline did.
  2. The older I get the more naturally a scowl seems to settle on my face. On the other hand, studies show that when people speak with a smile, the hearer can tell. This sounds like voodoo to me, but it seems worth a shot. People who can see me must certainly prefer to be greeted with a smile rather than a frown.
  3. Greet people. Wouldn’t it be better to start a conversation with, “Hi, how are you?” or at least, “Hello!” rather than, “I want…” This small sacrifice of efficiency for kindness seems like it would be of value to someone who faces an unending line of customers always asking for something.

My old list was pretty much limited to, “Don’t scream at people unless they really deserve it.”

Is it possible that learning to be nice to people can make it easier for me to enjoy a reception or even a sales call? I hate making sales calls so much I basically refuse to make them. Could it be possible to become a truly nice person with practice? This jackass hopes so.

(Maybe this will even be the last time I call myself a jackass.) Wish me luck. The customer service people I meet will thank you. Here’s hoping we connect at a reception!

Hydro Therapy Pool in Parker Makes a Difference Without Much Splash

On October 6, 2017, I will be speaking at the Colorado Parks and Recreation Association annual conference. This story highlights the work of one of their members.


Around the world, local parks and recreation leaders serve without much notoriety or attention. You will immediately recognize the value parks bring to your community the moment you think of your city, town or neighborhood without them.

Beyond the parks, the activities within them provide a lifeline to underserved and at-risk community members. The hydro therapy pool in the Town of Parker in suburban Denver is an example of a community resource that is making a difference there without making much of a splash.

Deni Parker, 25, runs the therapy pool programs. The classes–and for now she teaches them all herself–serve only up to a handful at a time. Many of the sessions are one-on-one. A six-week course meeting twice per week costs just $30–about the cost of one session of physical therapy. In other words, the Parker therapy program costs just about one-twelfth as much.

Watch my full interview with Deni in the video player at the top of this article.

Deni, who played basketball in college, loves her job and the people she serves. She offers classes for seniors and others suffering from arthritis, providing a low impact, low-weight, low-pain opportunity for them to move and get exercise. She also has classes for cancer survivors and people recovering from injuries and surgeries, including people with hip replacements. The therapy pool provides a safe place for them to get exercise.

The students love the classes, often arriving early, lingering to go for lunch with classmates and then returning to visit on days when there is no class. The therapy programs have served over 3,000 people.

Her programs are not entirely self-funding. They rely on surpluses from the more popular youth athletic programs. Overall, the programs at Parker Parks and Recreation Department achieve a 100 percent recovery. The recreation facilities recover between 80-90 percent of their operating costs, she says proudly. “Parker’s recovery rate far outpaces the national average,” she adds.

“Our primary focus remains on services, not finances,” Deni says. This approach attracts patrons from people outside of Parker, increasing revenue and allowing the Town to expand programs and better serve Parker residents.

Deni Jacobs, courtesy of Parker Parks and Recreation Department

Deni Jacobs, courtesy of Parker Parks and Recreation Department

More about Town of Parker’s Parks and Recreation Department:

Twitter: @ParkerRec

The Town’s Parks and Recreation Department was created shortly after the Town was incorporated and its citizens approved a one-half percent sales and use tax in 1990. This fund, which has grown as the Town has grown, provides funding for the construction, maintenance and operation of various park and recreation facilities and amenities. With the guidance of our Town Council and the support of our citizens, Parker’s Parks and Recreation Department has become one of the premier providers for park and recreation services in the state and winner of two Gold Medal awards (2000 and 2011) from the National Recreation and Parks Association. The mission for the Parker Parks and Recreation Department is “To provide quality parks and recreation facilities and services to meet the needs of our community by utilizing the resources of our team, and fostering an environment that encourages support, creativity, and integrity.”

Deni’s bio:

I am the daughter of Shawn and Kathy Jacobs, originally from a small town in Kansas where I grew up on a farm/ranch. After attending Garden City Community College for two years, I was recruited for a full scholarship to play basketball at Metropolitan State University in Denver Colorado. There I was awarded first team Academic All-District in recognition of outstanding accomplishments on the court and in the classroom. I was fortunate to be the first women’s basketball player in Metro State’s history to earn that honor. During my time at Metro I discovered Therapeutic Recreation (TR) and it aligned perfectly with my passion for helping others. After graduating with a Bachelors of Arts with a concentration in Therapeutic Recreation and passing the certification test, I was offered the Therapeutic/Senior Programs Coordinator position with the Town of Parker in December 2015. During my time with the Town of Parker I have added several new programs within TR including an Aquatic Therapy Program, Unified Kickball League, Buddy Bike Ride Program, a Bowling League and more. I have also been instrumental in the creation of new programs in the areas of chronic conditions. I am a very dedicated young professional whose main goal is to help the community thrive and provide outreach to underserved populations.

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

 

Upscale Purse Delivers Purses With a Purpose

Chris Bray, a fixture in Utah’s nonprofit community, has launched a social enterprise she hopes will power the rest of her career with still greater impact.

Chris recognized that nonprofits are always looking for more funding, especially from funding partners that understand their mission and objectives and will support them appropriately. She decided to become such a funder.

She created Upscale Purse, an online retailer that sells new and used high-quality purses and gives 10 percent to charity. The upstart is already breaking even and she’s excited to see it grow.

Watch the full interview with Chris in the player at the top of this article.

Chris is focusing on charities that serve and support women. “Women have tremendous barriers in their way and many have become victims of cruel and inhuman acts. One in three women will experience some form of domestic violence sometime in their life (Utah Women Stats, 2017).”

“In 2016, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children estimated that 1 in 6 endangered runaways reported to them were likely sex trafficking victims,” Chris continues. “The International Labor Organization estimates that there are 4.5 million people trapped in forced sexual exploitation globally. According to the Report, in the United States, the most common form of human trafficking (79%) is sexual exploitation. The victims are predominantly women and girls.”

“At Upscale Purse, our purpose is not only to provide an opportunity to purchase beautiful purses and handbags but also deliver funding to support women escaping crisis situations and offer them an opportunity for hope and a fulfilling life. A portion of the sale of every purse will be distributed to select nonprofit partners.”

Chris Bray, Upscale Purse

Chris Bray, Upscale Purse

More about Upscale Purse:

Upscale Purse combines fashion with purpose and sells beautiful, upscale purses then gives as least 10% to nonprofits working with disadvantaged women escaping domestic violence or human trafficking. These are purses with a purpose! Organized as a low-profit company, we make a measurable positive impact on women’s lives through the sale of purses, donations to carefully vetted nonprofits serving disadvantaged women and the volunteer experiences we create.Partners provide services that include mentoring, education and assistance escaping dangerous situations.

Chris’s bio:

I have served in the nonprofit community for over 30 years. I have worked at the CEO of Utah Nonprofits Association, Vice President of Collective Impact at United Way of Salt Lake, Executive Director of Children’s Service Society and The Sharing Place. My past work has centered mostly in nonprofit services impacting children but in the past few years, I have worked with more organizations focused on women’s challenges. Happy and balanced women are an important cornerstone of successful families and our communities. Many women have tremendous barriers in their way to achieve their goals and too many have become victims of cruel and inhuman acts. I decided to start a company that sales purses and invests in nonprofits addressing these barriers. Because of my background in collective impact strategies, this company will work with the nonprofits who achieve significant impact for the women they serve and are making a measurable community impact.

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

 

Breaking the Bad From My Pilgrimage to the Home of Walter White

 

This article was originally written for GoodCrowd.info.

Last weekend, Gail and I visited Albuquerque, New Mexico on a quest to visit shooting locations for the show Breaking Bad. We drove from our home in Salt Lake City and then all around the city. We also visited Farmington and Santa Fe. We had a great time despite putting 1,800 miles on our rented Ford Focus in four days. I was feeling rather guilty about the environmental impact of such a trip so I found a way to offset my carbon impact.

Gail and I sold our car almost three years ago. I wrote about our decision for Forbes. It is one of the most popular articles I’ve written and by far the most well remembered. People still frequently comment on our decision to sell our BMW SUV. One of our motivations for selling it was to be more environmentally friendly. So this long road trip with virtually no socially redeeming value left me feeling a bit guilty.

The home of fictional Breaking Bad character Walter White

The home of fictional Breaking Bad character Walter White

Recently, I wrote a Forbes piece about Cool Effect, a crowdfunding site that sells carbon credits. I figured it was about time I put what I learned into practice.

First, I had to determine how much carbon my trip produced. There are lots of calculators out there so I picked the first one that tickled my fancy with a quick Google search. With less than one minute of data entry, the calculator estimated that my trip produced 0.46 metric tonnes of carbon. Frankly, I was relieved that it was so little. There were times I thought I could feel sea-level rising as I passed slow-moving trucks going uphill.

Next, I visited CoolEffect.org where I was presented with about a dozen projects that all provide carbon offsets. Today, the prices offered for carbon offsets ranged from $6.04 per tonne to $13.18. Each project does something different to reduce carbon.

The cheapest carbon offset project is called “What’s Cooking?” It provides fuel efficient cookstoves in Uganda, reducing the carbon emissions from cooking there.  The ancillary benefits of this program include saving money for low-income households as they buy and burn less fuel, mostly charcoal. It also reduces deforestation there–charcoal is produced by partially burning wood. Perhaps most importantly, the project improves the health of women and children who spend time around cooking fires.

The most expensive project is called “Putting Methane in Its Place.” The project is located on the Southern Ute Indian reservation in La Plata County, Colorado. There, natural coal seams exposed to the atmosphere by erosion are leaking methane. The Tribe developed a way to capture and use the methane, preventing it from leaking into the atmosphere and allowing Tribe members to use the methane rather than purchasing propane or natural gas that had been drilled. The project also creates jobs for Tribe members.

For my carbon offset–I went all kinds of crazy and bought one entire tonne of carbon offset despite having generated only 0.46 tonnes–I chose “Wind Power to the People.” This project in Costa Rica provides wind power to 50,000 people in 10,000 households in rural Costa Rica. It also provides income to co-op owners in impoverished areas.

All of the projects have been triple checked and verified to assure investors that the carbon offsets they buy are real.  A typical American will generate between 16 and 20 tonnes of carbon per year. A household of four might produce 80 tonnes. Offsetting 100 percent of that carbon production would cost as little as $483.20 or just about $40 per month. While not universally true, there is a positive correlation with income and carbon production. Bigger homes produce more carbon. More cars driven more miles produce more carbon. Taking public transit dramatically reduces your carbon footprint. So does eating less meat! The bottom line is that for most households, offsetting their carbon production is now as cheap as it is easy. Try breaking your bad at CoolEffect.

Wringing Costs From Solar Is Goal For This Berkeley PhD

You can download an audio podcast here or subscribe via iTunes.

Jason Trager is more than a throwback to the sixties or a cliche. He may have earned a PhD at Berkeley with a focus on improving the energy efficiency in buildings by applying statistical process controls, but he’s also a hard core entrepreneur who relishes profit–so long as it doesn’t adversely impact others.

He calls himself and his firm “Sustainabilist.” He says that unlike a capitalist who hordes profits and socializes externalities like pollution and carbon, a Sustainabilist hordes profits without socializing externalities. He says, “Our quest is carbon reduction. Every dollar that we make can be linked to some amount of carbon that does not make it into the atmosphere.”

Sustainabilist, the firm, is working on a number of projects, but one key area of focus is on applying statistical process controls to the process of solar installation. By doing so, he hopes to not only improve the quality of solar installations but also to reduce costs, thereby accelerating adoption.

Jason explains, “The same statistics and operational frameworks that are used to mass-produce cars, pens, beer, and soda cans can be used to detect and minimize problems with solar installations and building operations.”

He notes that the soft costs of solar installations are especially challenging. “Through our methodology, we have been able to use data to pick out issues with contractor installation techniques. If we can improve the process of the installation of solar, we can potentially eliminate an estimated $181 million in expense that it costs contractors to go back to sites in order to fix problems,” he concludes.

Sustainabilist is also working on a platform called RosettaBlock that employs open-source standards to close the feedback loop between contractors, building owners and operators and the solar manufacturers. He hopes this feedback loop can help further reduce the cost of solar.

With his focus on the environment and sustainability, Jason lives up to the Berkeley reputation. His entrepreneurial drive may allow him to accelerate solar adoption to the benefit of everyone on the planet.

Jason Trager, courtesy of Sustainabilist

Jason Trager, courtesy of Sustainabilist

More about Sustainabilist:

Twitter: @sustainabilist

We provide contracting and consulting services to sustainable businesses and companies that wish to be more sustainable. Our specialities are: quality for solar and energy efficiency control through data science, marketing and communications for sustainable enterprises, and corporate social responsibility for the enterprise. We are also producing SaaS products for social good, such as RosettaBlock and the PlusFarm urban farming controller that we are producing in collaboration with Blue Planet Consulting and CommonGarden.

Jason’s bio:

Dr. Trager is an engineer and sustainability professional with experience in utilizing data to drive profitable results while simultaneously reducing the carbon footprint of businesses. Through his company, Sustainabilist, he demonstrates his passion for building technically sound businesses that reduce the rate of anthropogenic climate change. He earned a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, where he studied the application of statistical process control (SPC) and other mass production methodologies for energy efficiency in buildings. His program also included a designated emphasis in energy science and technology in addition to a certificate in Engineering and Business for Sustainability. He has since focused on applying SPC frameworks to improve the quality of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects with groups such as the Institute for Building Safety and Technology (IBTS), and kW Engineering.

Jason is the founder of Sustainabilist, a personalized political philosophy which guides the company. He believes that being a Sustainabilist is like being a capitalist, but that you are not obligated to maximise profit at expense of all else. Instead, the obligation is to internalize and minimize the negative externalities created by your business. It is acceptable to maximise profit as a Sustainabilist, but the previously given constraint must be satisfied at all times.

Jason’s areas of experience include business development, energy data science, product life cycle assessment, scientific coding, fundraising, team management, and bicycle repair. He is a serial entrepreneur who has been a key founder in three companies. Jason values teamwork and diversity on projects. He is committed to living by sustainable values and is always willing to have a discussion about how to improve the world.

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

 

How Your Nonprofit Can Use $10,000 Per Month of Free Google Adwords


You can download an audio podcast here or subscribe via iTunes.

It may be no secret that Google is giving away $10,000 per month in free Google Ads to nonprofits but many are still not taking full advantage of the opportunity.

Daniela Larsen, who leads both a for-profit marketing agency called Navanas Agency and a nonprofit called the Navanas Institute doing economic development work and education online and around the world, shares insights on how to get and use the monthly grant.

Daniela says most active nonprofits qualify. View eligibility details here. The basic guidelines require that you have a substantive website and that you be a legitimate nonprofit. Hospitals and universities are not eligible.

Be sure to watch the entire interview with Daniela at the top of this article to get all of her insights.

Nonprofits must use ’em or lose ’em. If you don’t actively use the grants, Google will cancel the account. There are other rules for use, mostly aimed at ensuring that the ads benefit your nonprofit–and not a corporate sponsor or partner. What a great program! Google really wants you to take full advantage.

The program gives a nonprofit a daily Adwords budget that represents about 1/30th of the $10,000, Daniela says. Adwords is Google’s advertising platform. Advertisers bid on words and phrases. The grant only allows bids up to $2.00 per word.

Many nonprofits lack the skills to take full advantage of the program and so they let these funds go to waste. Navanas Agency helps nonprofits take full advantage, with advisory fees as low as $500 per month.

There are a variety of tools available online to help you learn how to utilize Google Adwords, so even if you don’t know how today, check Udemy or Youtube for instructions and you can become proficient.

Daniela suggests using a strategy to maximize the return on the $10,000. For example, she explained that one nonprofit that provides sight-restoring surgeries that cost just $25 in the developing world did an effective Father’s Day promotion.

The nonprofit got donors to give their father a gift of someone else’s sight, making Dad a hero for Father’s Day. Making the donor, or in this case the gift recipient, a hero is a powerful way to build a relationship.

In a nutshell, nonprofits can quickly apply and qualify for $10,000 per month of free Google Adwords. With a little, affordable help, any nonprofit should be able to utilize these funds effectively to attract donations and expand its impact.

Daniela Larsen, Navanas

Daniela Larsen, Navanas

Danaiela’s bio:

Twitter: @navanasinc, @navanas1

Daniela has seen the explosive impact non profits can have when they treat themselves like a business and take marketing seriously. She has worked with many non profits to create revenue generating campaigns using email marketing, video, social media and expeditions to create sustainable revenue. She serves on the boards of Small Candles, The Hutchings Natural History Museum, Skymaster’s Wildlife Foundation and MIT Ghana. She is passionate about creating and distributing education that make the world a better place with current projects in Nepal, Madagascar, Kenya and Ghana. Daniela and her husband Nathan have 5 children. They “worldschool” their family by traveling broadly, learning online from the world’s best mentors and teaching other families how to do the same.

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at DevinThorpe.com!

 

Journalist Virtually Resurrects Homeless Man



Justin Huggard died last December.  In April, the Deseret News ran a 4,000-word story about him. The remarkable thing was not that the News took four months to write his obituary, rather it was that they wrote anything at all.

Justin was homeless. Addicted. Invisible.

While he died on Main Street in the heart of downtown Salt Lake City; his passing was so anonymous that even those good-hearted activists who track the casualties of homelessness each year missed his death. At the annual vigil for the homeless who die in Salt Lake, the names of the year’s victims are read, remembered and honored fleetingly. But not Justin.

Daphne Chen, a reporter for the News worked four months on the story, stalking family and friends on Facebook, piecing together the life story of Justin Huggard. In a sense, she resurrected Justin so that he could be remembered as the human being he was.

Daphne made Justin into a proxy for the homeless people living and dead in our community.

Writing a story like this is difficult, on many levels. As Daphne points out, “There are no press releases when Justin Huggard dies.”

Daphne acknowledged that she didn’t expect the story to be so emotionally difficult–she’s covered tragedies many times in the past. “It started as this gray, plastic box of ashes.” But as she took Justin from an anonymous homeless man to a full-fledged human being with a family, friends, a kind personality and a history, she began to feel a sense of loss.

Daphne works on the “In Depth” beat for the Deseret News, so she works on stories for months, several at a time. While working on Justin’s story she was also working on a story about Utah’s mental health hospital. Patients assigned to the hospital by the courts often wait for five or six months for placement. Some die in the interim.

At the same time, the paper assigned Daphne to cover the controversial firing and re-hiring of the CEO of the Huntsman Cancer Institute and the subsequent firing of the CEO of the University of Utah Medical Center followed by the resignation of the President of the University of Utah. Daphne wasn’t bored looking for things to do.

Daphne Chen, Deseret News

Daphne Chen, Deseret News

Daphne, originally from Dallas, Texas, has been with the News for one and a half years. She previously reported from New York and North Carolina where she covered crime, health and education.

The key to the Justin Huggard story was Aimee Rolfe, a friend of Justin who was eager to help Daphne find the family and tell the story. They had shared a great deal together, including struggles with drugs. While Justin struggled with alcohol and “some heroin,” Aimee’s nemesis was meth. With her help, the story came alive.

Ultimately, Daphne told Justin’s story too late for anyone to do anything for him. But that isn’t the point. Daphne Pulitzer-caliber story didn’t just “give a voice to the voiceless” but also changed our understanding of who those experiencing homelessness are: human beings with families, friends and hopes who are suffering a life and death trauma in plain sight.

She Persisted Is The Best Book of 2017 (So Far)

Naomi was just four years old on November 8, 2016, but she was devastated by the outcome of the U.S. presidential election. Months earlier, she had seen Hillary Clinton in the debates on television and asked excitedly, “Is there a girl one?” From that moment, she was “with her.”

Naomi

Naomi

Naomi represents a generation of young women who almost got to see a woman become the most powerful person in the world. Instead, their hopes were dashed. Not only their hopes for a woman becoming the president, but also their personal hopes and dreams. If a woman can’t be president, what can’t I do, they’ve collectively asked.

On February 8, 2017, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell explained the body’s silencing of Senator Elizabeth Warren for reading a letter from Coretta Scott King (which had previously been read and was later read on the floor by men) saying, “Senator Warren was giving a lengthy speech. She had appeared to violate the rule. She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.” The silencing of Elizabeth Warren highlighted the persistent misogyny in America and the explanation instantly became a feminist battle cry.

Chelsea Clinton, daughter of the former presidential candidate, has now written a book for Naomi and the countless young girls like her. The book, which profiles thirteen women who overcame great obstacles to do or become something great, is called, She Persisted.

She Persisted, illustrated by Alexandra Boiger, profiles women like Harriet Tubman and Oprah Winfrey with whom we are all familiar and also profiles women who were unknown to me (whether that is due to my education or my own latent biases, I don’t know), including Clara Lemlich and Maria Tallchief. Lemlich was an activist for workers’ rights; Tallchief, it turns out, was the first great American prima ballerina.

This feminist teared up on every page, with every story.

Even if you don’t think of yourself as a feminist–I know that word is loaded–you will be inspired by this book. If you have a daughter like Naomi, think you might have a daughter or just think you might meet someone else’s daughter you must, get yourself a copy of She Persisted, my choice for the best book of 2017 (so far).

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