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 The mission of the "Your Mark on the World Center" is to solve the world's biggest problems before 2045 by identifying and championing the work of experts who have created credible plans and programs to end them once and for all.
Crowdfunding for Social Good
Devin D. Thorpe
Devin Thorpe

Devin Thorpe

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Specific Responses to the Question: How Will You Increase Your Impact in 2018?

To kick off the year with some powerful inspiration, I asked some successful social entrepreneurs and others in the impact community, to answer a simple question: “How will you increase your impact in 2018?”

The answers fell naturally into two groups. The first group were broadly relevant answers that almost any social entrepreneur could mimic. The second group were more specific, based on their particular mission. The first list I published on Forbes here. The second cohort of responses, equally inspiring, are listed below in alphabetical order by respondent.

Adlai Wertman, David. C. Bohnett Professor of Social Entrepreneurship of USC Marshall Brittingham Social Enterprise Lab:

“I review our programs each year to ensure full alignment with our mission statement.”

Adlai Wertman

Adlai Wertman

Alan Naumann, sales manager of Rocky Mountain Renewable Energy:

I will increase collaboration with Native Americans.  I want to support Native American voices, political power and Co management of the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, in particular!

Amory Lovins, co-founder and chief scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute:

Having proven that optimizing vehicles, buildings, factories, and equipment as whole systems can make very big energy savings very cheap (expanding returns), I aim to figure out how to turn such “integrative design” from rare to common.

Amy Cortese, Author, founder of Locavesting of Locavesting (also inevstibule):

More collaboration. We’re stronger together. I’m encouraged by the many efforts to join up disparate initiatives in 2018.

Andreas Karelas, executive director of RE-volv:

One person, truly empowered, can make a real difference. RE-volv’s 2018 goal is to empower scores of people with the tools they need to lead the clean energy revolution, starting in their communities.

Arlene Samen, founder of One Heart World Wide:

Our model “The Network of Safety” will be open sourced so others can save the lives of women in childbirth.

Arlene Samen

Billy Starr, founder and executive director of Pan-Mass Challenge:

We will grow every aspect of our cycling weekend which currently has 6,000 cyclists, 12 routes and 315,000 donors to cancer research. Our growth strategy also includes a winter indoor cycle event.

Charles Best, founder of

We’ll explore ways to strengthen the connection between our teachers and the donors and organizations that give on, in order to grow our community of passionate education supporters.

Dallas Graham, publisher and executive director of Red Fred Project:

Creating a toolkit for local professionals so they can assist in the effort of making more books with more children.

Daryl Hatton, CEO of FundRazr:

We are expanding our suite of digital fundraising power tools to help our professional fundraising customers do an ever-better job of engaging their communities and communicating their impact.

David D’Angelo, marketing director of Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden :

We will launch a revenue generating, social impact fellowship program, manage our new permaculture project, and develop a new international festival called “Voyages” to develop tourism in Laos.

Howard Leonhardt , executive chairman of Leonhardt’s Launchpads (with whom I have a business relationship):

Will work to complete development of a whole body organ regeneration chamber designed to regenerate humans to live 30 years longer with high quality of life.

Jack Griffin, founder of FoodFinder:

For issues like poverty and hunger, we may never truly win the war. But in 2018, I will do everything I can to move the needle on food insecurity since helping even a single life is worth it.  

Jack Griffin

Jason S. Trager, Ph.D., managing partner of Sustainabilist:

We’re using data-driven content marketing to reach more clients for our process improvement and quality assurance work in sustainability.

Jenny Kassan, owner of Jenny Kassan Consulting:

I will get more mission-driven female entrepreneurs funded by investors that love and support them.

Jill Vialet, CEO and founder of Playworks:

We’re giving away our secret sauce, enabling partners and educators to make play more safe and healthy in order to reach 1mm kids in 2000 schools this year

Kathryn Pisco, founder and CEO of Unearth the World:

We will increase our impact by planning transformative skills-based volunteer abroad programs for socially-minded companies. We will grow our local volunteer initiatives to catalyze change in the US!

Laura Callanan, founding partner of Upstart Co-Lab:

With a pipeline of more than $1.5 billion in opportunities over the next five years, the time has come to borrow from the lessons of gender lens investing and introduce a Creativity Lens to impact investing.

Laura Callanan, courtesy of Upstart Co-Lab

Laura Lemle, PhD., founder and chairperson of The NVLD Project:

In 2018 we will be increasing our presence on social media by working directly with people who have NVLD to spread awareness about the disability.

Laurie Lane-Zucker, founder and CEO of Impact Entrepreneur (Center, LLC, Network):

Our global network is active around blockchain and cryptocurrencies. I joined the Impact Token Project as Advisor and am looking at integrating blockchain as an operating system in our projects.

Marisa de Belloy, CEO of Cool Effect:

We’ll be launching a campaign to show people, for the first time ever, carbon emissions. When you can see the problem, you can fight it!

Melody Saunders Brenna, CEO Founder of Reef Life Restoration NanoScience:

Reduce manufacturing impact by inclusion of industrial waste. RLR advanced nano materials bring higher strengths using less cement/sand. Encapsulation of plastic/refuse = dual purpose CLEAN profits.

Nancy Hughes, president and founder of StoveTeam International:

I will be raising awareness of the dangers of open fire cooking

Nissan Bahar, co-founder of Bitwalking:

Build a currency only for the purpose of making life better, believing in the irreducible value of every human being.

Nissan Bahar and Franking Imbesi with a student in Africa, courtesy of Keepod

Pat Walsh, co-founder and chief impact officer of Classy:

Mobilize our employees to make a greater impact through philanthropy, and leverage our product and data to enable nonprofits to be transparent and communicate their impact with the world.

Peter Fusaro, EVP of 41 North Securities:

We are helping companies obtain capital to accelerate solutions in sustainability in clean energy, clean water and sustainable agriculture. That impacts the environment and reduces greenhouse gases.

Rahel, managing director of Afrolehar:

In 2018, we will be producing more multimedia content in addition to implementing our technology solutions to facilitate trade of added–value products between Africa and North America.

Rebecca Firth, community and partnerships manager of Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team:

Help anyone, anywhere contribute to development through making really complicated things really simple through apps.

Ryan Scott, CEO and founder of ICO Advisory Group:

Create a pipeline for new cryptocurrency offerings to give back to charity both as donation during their ICOs, and with their ongoing operations.

Shane DeRolf, Founder & CEO of Big Word Club:

Big Word Club is committed to closing the Word Gap in America.  In 2018,  we are seeking to prove the efficacy of BWC in a randomized control trial funded by J-PAL, a leading research center at MIT.

Siddharth Chatterjee, resident coordinator to Kenya of United Nations:

We will partner with private sector, civil society, faith-based organizations to support Government of Kenya’s efforts to leapfrog Universal Health Coverage. #UHC=Defeating poverty =Economic prosperity = #SDG 3 & 1.

Wendy Lipton-Dibner

Wendy Lipton-Dibner, president of Professional Impact, Inc.:

Launching business number 11, dedicated to finding, funding, & fostering hidden difference-makers so they can make the impact they were born to bring the world without giving up their lives to make it happen.

Never miss another feature! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at!

Turning Over an Old Leaf Ends 3-Year Run Without a Car

Its over. Its been more than three years that Gail and I have lived without owning a car. When we sold the car, I wrote about our plans in what became one of my most popular and memorable Forbes articles. When I meet people for the first time, it is the most commonly mentioned article. Last week, we bought a car.

While I still dont have a commute, my mother recently moved across town and visiting her in her new home requires a $25 Uber rideeach wayor a 90-minute public transit trip followed by a mile walk. Not wishing to disappoint her, we determined that this was a bridge too far for our auto-less lifestyle, so we bought one. More about that here in a bit.

green leaf on a white

With the benefit of three more years of experience, let me update you on what worksand what doesntin the world without a car. Ill work from my original list of twelve things that allowed me to live without a car.

  1. com. There is no question that we have become more delightedly dependent on over the past three yearswho hasnt. It made not owning a car easier.
  2. Living downtown, we really have walked routinely to do errands others drive to do, especially shopping. We live a short walk from a shopping mall and just another block from the nearest grocery store. Comfortable walks all-in-all.
  3. Light rail. Weve logged a lot of miles on light rail here in Salt Lake. It generally runs on time, its affordable and not much slower than drivingso long as your destination is a light rail station.
  4. Commuter rail. We have regularly usedand will continue to usethe rail line that runs about 100 miles from Ogden to Provo along the Wasatch Front. Roomy, comfortable, quick and far cheaper than driving an internal combustion engine car, it is hard to beat.
  5. Bike share. I used the bike share for two years but then canceled my membership. I found that walking is better exercise and I seldom used the bikes. Im hoping that the cheaper, rack-free rental bikes will come to Salt Lake City.
  6. Over the past three years, Ive taken a lot of buses. In many ways, I love them. Real people ride the bus. The reality, however, is that buses move through town at a rate just faster than I can run. With their frequent stops, they run at less than half the speed of an automobile. For long trips, that gets frustrating.
  7. I used Lyft often enough to figure out that the app has an algorithm for estimating the arrival time of a ride that seems to average about one-half of the actual time required for a ride to come. Otherwise, the experience is virtually identical to Uber.
  8. Uber (and Lyft) are really what make not owning a car possible. There are so many times and places that public transit wont go where you want when you want that without Uber I would have needed a car.
  9. Apart from out-of-town travel, I havent used a taxi since just before writing the Forbes article more than three years ago.
  10. Car sharing. Enterprise operated a car-share program in Salt Lake City. I subscribed and used the service about once-per month at first. Over time, my experience was disappointing. If the car wasnt where it was supposed to besay because the last user couldnt return it to its proper place because some jerk had parked there illegallyId end up late for a meeting. Ill spare you the story of Christmas 2015, but I only used the service once after that. Enterprise recently closed the program and, to my knowledge, no one else is operating one in Salt Lake.
  11. I have become more dependent on my local Avis. Located right on my block, Ive been renting a car there an average of more than two days per month. I maintain liability insurance and always use a credit card that provides coverage for the rented car. Even before selling my car, Id often rent a car from Avis for road trips. Better to put 1,200 miles on an Avis car than my own! Im sure I will do so in the future, too.
  12. During our three years without a car, we were frequent beneficiaries of kindnesses of all sorts. To all our friends, we love and appreciate your help and support.

So, we broke down and bought a 2012 Nissan Leaf. This is an all-electric car unlike a Toyota Prius that has both an electric motor and a traditional internal combustion engine to share the work.

The car has rather limited utility. The original range of the car was about 80 miles. That has declined to about 50 miles over the years. Ive described it as having a car with a one-gallon gas tank, that needs a rare form of gasoline that takes a long time to fill the little tank.

You see, with a range of 50 miles and a need for cushion, given that you dont always know how quickly you can find a place to plug in, you can only go about 40 miles. Thats 20 miles out and 20 miles back. Thats my new life.

The best news: it takes barely more than $1 of electricity to fill the little tank.

That limited range means public transit, Uber/Lyft and Avis will still be a part of my life. So, too, will explaining to friends why I need to plug my car in at their houses if they ever want me to leave!

Of course, I didnt buy this car because it was so utilitarian. I bought it because it is environmentally friendly. Let me answer a key question that may have already come to your mind.

NARA, JAPAN – NOVEMBER 23, 2016: Nissan Leaf electric car charging at a station in Nara, Japan.

“Arent you just moving from oil to coal to power your car?” The simple answer is no. Let me explain.

  1. Even though Rocky Mountain Power still produces most of its power from coal, that mix is changing to include more wind and solar all the time. I participate in Rocky Mountain Powers Blue Sky program, where I pay extra each month to help fund the transition to renewable energy. I also buy carbon credits monthly from (You should, too.)
  2. Electric motors are so much more efficient than internal combustion engines (ICEs) that my car is about three times as efficient as a typical ICE car. Even if much of the power for the car comes from coal, it is about two-thirds less damaging to the environment.
  3. To the extent that coal is powering my car, that coal plant isnt contributing to air pollution in the city where I live. Additionally, the plant can be equipped with more filters and cleaners than a vehicle tailpipe to remove toxic emissions.
  4. By switching from Uber/Lyft to Leaf, given that Ive never had a ride in an all-electric vehicle, I am dramatically decreasing my contribution to pollution and global warming.

So, Im turning over an old Leaf, ending my three-year experiment on life without a car and looking forward to one day owning a Tesla.

Hiroshima Survivor Has a Message for Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un: ‘No More Hiroshima’

Toshiharu Kano, 71, was born seven months after the United States dropped the bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Pregnant with Kano and living less than 1 kilometer or about half a mile from the center of the blast, his mother Shizzue Neomoto miraculously survived. She took her two children to a nearby military base. His brother, just 18 months old, died within 60 days of the bombing.

As a survivor, Kano endured a variety of physical challenges. His immune system was impaired and got mumps seven times. Labeled by society as defective, Kano and his family were spurned. By age ten, he felt so rejected that he seriously contemplated suicide. He was repeatedly told he was damaged goods.

Ultimately, Kano and his family immigrated to the United States. Here in the U.S., Kano thrived. He says he’s missed only 10 days of work or school in the past 47 years. He attended the University of Utah and earned a BS in mechanical engineering.

Kano married and had one son. His son was born healthy and at 6′ 1″, towers over his father. He recalls seeing an x-ray of his son just hours before he was delivered by cesarian section. He counted all of the fingers and toes and relaxed when he realized that they were all there.

Kano’s sister, never fully recovering from the jeers of her youth, chose never to marry or have children.

The picture was taken by Charles Levy from one of the B-29 Superfortresses used in the attack.

Kano notes that the bomb dropped on Hiroshima was a mere “toy” compared with modern nuclear weapons. Still, the “Little Boy” bomb dropped on Hiroshima killed about 100,000 people. The bomb packed the punch of 15 kilotons of TNT.

By comparison, the largest bomb ever detonated was built by the USSR and had the equivalent of 50,000 kilotons or 50 megatons of TNT, about 3,000 times more powerful than Little Boy.

In his book, Passport to Hiroshima, Kano says, “I have a message from God to tell all of the world leaders that we cannot use the nuclear weapons to settle their differences ever again.”

He told me, the message is simple. “No more Hiroshima. No more Nagasaki.”

Kano’s bio:

Toshiharu Kano was not yet born when the blast occurred high above Hiroshima. His sister, brother and mother (who was pregnant, still to give birth to him) were in town and within one half mile from the Hypocenter of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. As stated in his book, Passport to Hiroshima, “(they) miraculously survived the concussion force of the nuclear winds and the ensuing firestorm.” Toshiharu was born seven months later in March, 1946 at just over 3 lbs. Having survived the early immune deficiencies in childhood, he came to America, graduated from the University of Utah and made a successful career as a Civil Engineer. Tosh retired in 1999, but continues to work as a Civil Engineering Consultant to Holladay City, Taylorsville City and Cottonwood Heights City.

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at!

How to Promote Your Cause Without Provoking Your Friends

Recently the Pew Research Center published a report showing that Americans are more politically divided than any time since they started tracking such data in 1994. Our country has survived greater divisions than we now see: abortion, civil rights, slavery, and federalism.

Increasingly, at least anecdotally, it appears that people are fed up with divisions and conflict. At some level both liberals and conservatives find themselves wanting to check out. My readers challenged me to write this article to find a path forward.

Tempting as it may be to check out, the things that divide Americans are important issues. Gun safety is a critical issue with 35,000 people dying from gun deaths every year. Those on the left would like to reduce the availability of guns. Those on the right see more guns as the key to safety. That’s a pretty big disagreement on a topic that matters.

Climate change threatens to destabilize the planet while some continue to argue that it isn’t anthropogenic or even that it isn’t happening at all. And this issue doesn’t just impact America; what we do here impacts the entire planet. We need a process by which we can talk about this without completely talking past one another.

The social safety net helps millions of Americans avoid death, despair or homelessness each year but millions of others slip through the cracks. One sure way to avoid finding solutions is to not talk about the problems.

To figure out how we can have a productive discussion that respects people more than policies I had to ask experts because I’m not good at this. I’m as prone to getting emotional as anyone else but like my readers, I want to find a way to have these conversations constructively.

Cheryl Snapp Conner, courtesy of Snapp Conner PR

Cheryl Snapp Conner, courtesy of Snapp Conner PR

Cheryl Snapp Conner, CEO of Snapp Conner PR and a regular Forbes contributor approaches communications professionally. She helps businesses formulate messaging in these fraught times with an eye toward building audiences and customers.

She suggests you start by highlighting your common ground and acknowledge them for the things you may admire about them: awareness, passion, civic engagement. Only then does she suggest delving into the areas of disagreement.

Dr. Paul Jenkins, courtesy of Live on Purpose

Dr. Paul Jenkins, courtesy of Live on Purpose

Dr. Paul Jenkins, a professional psychologist and author of Pathological Positivity offers this advice:  “I remind myself to put people before problems and values before valuables.”

He points out that we are all prone to confusing facts and opinions.

In the animated film Inside Out the characters are riding along on the train of thoughts and a stack of boxes containing facts and opinions get jostled and spills out on the floor. One of the characters is concerned about getting them all back into the right boxes, and another character comments that it doesn’t really matter because they all look alike anyway. Your position is an opinion.


Jenkins goes on to say that once we form an opinion, we are subject to confirmation bias, where we look for or even create evidence to support our opinion. I’ve seen this happen in my own life. Having no opinion about the color of the new carpet, asked for one I weakly offered one. Suddenly, I find myself offended by every other color option. Three minutes earlier, I couldn’t have cared less.

It is probably more important to be open than to be right,” he says.

Conner similarly suggests acknowledging the inherent biases we all have.

Even when you’re on your best behavior, others may push your buttons, perhaps making a personal attack. What to do then?

Nancy Hoole Taylor, licensed mental health counselor, says, “Do not internalize what others say. It is usually more of a reflection of who they are and not yourself.”

Or, as Jenkins puts it, “A sure fire way to escalate a situation is to take things personally.”

He spent over a dozen years doing child custody evaluations for the court. “In these nasty divorce situations where people really needed to discuss issues in the interest of the children, their engagement in the personal conflicts commonly derailed the discussions and they spent an enormous amount of time and energy fighting and being offended.”

Jenkins offers four ideas for de-escalation:

  1. Understand that person’s opinion is not about you, even if they say it is. It is about their own position and may include their perception of you. The troubling aspect here is that it sounds like they are describing you because the character in their story has your name, face, and social security number. But think about it, how well does that person really know you at your core? They really don’t, right? That means that the person they are railing against, hating, or disparaging is not you – it is a fictional character they have fabricated in their own mind. Don’t defend that person – you would hate them too.
  2. Use the social gifts of appreciation, connection, enlightenment, and elevation instead of defensiveness or retaliation.
  3. Remember that the person who has offended you is merely supporting their opinion. It is not their job to support your opinion, take care of you emotionally, or make you feel good about yourself – those things are your job.
  4. Use the strategic non-response.

Jenkins’ number four seems especially appropriate when the only response you can conceive involves language your mother wouldn’t approve.

Conner has her own approach. She notes that if someone else was personally attacked she’d come to their defense. “If it were about me, I’d maybe address it with humor–‘I may somewhat have resembled that’–and then move the focus to the issue at hand.”

She suggests making a kind or empathetic remark and then closing the discussion with a note of mutual agreement more positive than simply agreeing to disagree. She also agrees that in some cases, the best strategy is to disengage.

Therapist Judith S. Moore shares her strategy: “I express my love for the one disagreeing with me, letting them know we can still be friends.”

Jenkins offers this important reminder, “People are not wrong about how they feel or their opinions, their position is completely consistent with their current set of beliefs and perceptions. Let them be right about that. It’s also okay to not have an end to a discussion, to remain in the question and remember that opinions (including, and perhaps especially, your own) change.

The best advice of all, I think, was Jenkins’ parting wisdom: “Give up your need to be right.”

Key Job Skill for This Position: No Complaining About Rats and Roaches

“I look for a great communicator who can tell some of the most important stories in the world. Also, someone who won’t complain about staying in a $2-a-night room with rats and roaches,” New York Times columnist Nick Kristof summarized by email what he looks for in his annual “Win-a-Trip” contest.

Each year, Kristof of the New York Times holds a “Win-a-Trip” contest to find a student journalist to travel with him on a reporting trip. For 2017, he selected Aneri Pattani to accompany him to Liberia.

Pattani, 22, described her experience as a “one of the best” she’s had.

“Because I had the privilege of traveling with Nick, interviewing people and writing about my experiences for a global community of readers, I was able to chip away at my own ignorance and hopefully spread new knowledge to a few others, too.”

Nick Kristof and Aneri Pattani, courtesy of the New York Times

“Aneri was fabulous!” Kristof said.

“She’s a natural journalist who wrote compellingly about leprosy, African journalism and so much more–and her work is blessed with empathy and intelligence, even though she’s pecking away at full speed,” he explained.

Pattani, for her part, admits that the key lesson she learned in Liberia was “how little I know.”

She admitted feeling “guilty” when visiting a hospital that serves 75,000 people, knowing all the while that she had more medicine in her luggage–including some basic antibiotics and ibuprofen–than the entire hospital had.

She was inspired by Mae Azango, a Liberian journalist who wrote about female genital mutilation and was then forced into hiding.

That experience is exactly what Kristof hopes to accomplish with the “Win-a-Trip” program each year. “I want to help nurture the next generation of journalists who care about the issues that I consider important, and more broadly, I want to encourage young people to engage with issues of global health and poverty.”

For the sake of future applicants, I coaxed some advice out of Pattani. She noted that Kristof chooses all sorts of students, not just journalism students. Her primary advice, “Just be really authentic and explain why this is important to you in a personal way.”

See my past interviews with 2015 winner Austin Meyer and 2016 winner Cassidy McDonald.

As for this year’s winner, Kristof shared his final thoughts on Pattani’s performance: “She didn’t protest a room with rats!”

Aneri Pattani

Aneri Pattani

Pattani’s bio:

Twitter: @aneripattani

Aneri Pattani is a recent graduate of Northeastern University, where she studied journalism and Spanish. She spent part of the summer traveling with Nicholas Kristof to Liberia as the winner of his annual international reporting trip contest. After that, she spent 10 weeks working as a James Reston reporting fellow on the health/science desk of The New York Times. Her work has previously appeared in The Boston Globe, The Texas Tribune, CNBC and The Hartford Courant. When she’s not working, she enjoys learning new dance forms and cooking new types of food.

Never miss another interview! Join Devin here!

Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at!


How I Will Stop Being a Jackass and Start Being Nice Instead

I have repeatedly confessed my guilt at being a jackass. I also think of myself as a humanitarian.

Yes, those two things are deeply at odds but they are not completely incompatible. You see, my career is entirely focused on helping to solve the world’s biggest problems: poverty, disease and climate change. I continue to work actively in several ways on each of these areas. I take them seriously.

Despite that, I think I inherited from my humanitarian father, either by close association or perhaps genetically, a tendency to dislike associating with people. Of course, I spend lots of time with people and love the time I spend with Gail, my wife. But there is little I hate worse than a reception where I am expected to chat up people I don’t know. This is true even though I have enjoyed meeting virtually everyone I’ve ever met at a reception.

What’s worse, is that I have long had a problem with all forms of customer service people, whether we are talking about “Peter” with the heavy Indian accent on the phone representing my airline or the order takers at McDonalds. Something in my mind always whispers, “They’re out to get you.”

(Yes, I am aware of the irony of treating badly people who earn minimum wage while advocating on behalf of low-income people and for social justice.)

Of course, this is absurd. For years, I have tried to address this by pledging not to be a jackass to customer service people. It remains my greatest personal challenge.

Today, I had an epiphany. Instead of trying not to be a jackass, I will instead try to be nice. Really nice.

I figure, that if I try to be in the top ten percent of customers as measured by niceness, then I’m not being a jackass. It also has the benefit of not requiring that I remind myself before every interaction that I have been a jackass in the past, which seems to have had the effect of reinforcing the idea that I am a jackass.

So, here’s my three-point plan to be nice to people, especially customer service people.

  1. Learn and remember names. It should be much easier to be kind to Peter than it is to the airline he represents. Peter didn’t lose my bag or foul up my reservation. The airline did.
  2. The older I get the more naturally a scowl seems to settle on my face. On the other hand, studies show that when people speak with a smile, the hearer can tell. This sounds like voodoo to me, but it seems worth a shot. People who can see me must certainly prefer to be greeted with a smile rather than a frown.
  3. Greet people. Wouldn’t it be better to start a conversation with, “Hi, how are you?” or at least, “Hello!” rather than, “I want…” This small sacrifice of efficiency for kindness seems like it would be of value to someone who faces an unending line of customers always asking for something.

My old list was pretty much limited to, “Don’t scream at people unless they really deserve it.”

Is it possible that learning to be nice to people can make it easier for me to enjoy a reception or even a sales call? I hate making sales calls so much I basically refuse to make them. Could it be possible to become a truly nice person with practice? This jackass hopes so.

(Maybe this will even be the last time I call myself a jackass.) Wish me luck. The customer service people I meet will thank you. Here’s hoping we connect at a reception!

Hydro Therapy Pool in Parker Makes a Difference Without Much Splash

On October 6, 2017, I will be speaking at the Colorado Parks and Recreation Association annual conference. This story highlights the work of one of their members.

Around the world, local parks and recreation leaders serve without much notoriety or attention. You will immediately recognize the value parks bring to your community the moment you think of your city, town or neighborhood without them.

Beyond the parks, the activities within them provide a lifeline to underserved and at-risk community members. The hydro therapy pool in the Town of Parker in suburban Denver is an example of a community resource that is making a difference there without making much of a splash.

Deni Parker, 25, runs the therapy pool programs. The classes–and for now she teaches them all herself–serve only up to a handful at a time. Many of the sessions are one-on-one. A six-week course meeting twice per week costs just $30–about the cost of one session of physical therapy. In other words, the Parker therapy program costs just about one-twelfth as much.

Watch my full interview with Deni in the video player at the top of this article.

Deni, who played basketball in college, loves her job and the people she serves. She offers classes for seniors and others suffering from arthritis, providing a low impact, low-weight, low-pain opportunity for them to move and get exercise. She also has classes for cancer survivors and people recovering from injuries and surgeries, including people with hip replacements. The therapy pool provides a safe place for them to get exercise.

The students love the classes, often arriving early, lingering to go for lunch with classmates and then returning to visit on days when there is no class. The therapy programs have served over 3,000 people.

Her programs are not entirely self-funding. They rely on surpluses from the more popular youth athletic programs. Overall, the programs at Parker Parks and Recreation Department achieve a 100 percent recovery. The recreation facilities recover between 80-90 percent of their operating costs, she says proudly. “Parker’s recovery rate far outpaces the national average,” she adds.

“Our primary focus remains on services, not finances,” Deni says. This approach attracts patrons from people outside of Parker, increasing revenue and allowing the Town to expand programs and better serve Parker residents.

Deni Jacobs, courtesy of Parker Parks and Recreation Department

Deni Jacobs, courtesy of Parker Parks and Recreation Department

More about Town of Parker’s Parks and Recreation Department:

Twitter: @ParkerRec

The Town’s Parks and Recreation Department was created shortly after the Town was incorporated and its citizens approved a one-half percent sales and use tax in 1990. This fund, which has grown as the Town has grown, provides funding for the construction, maintenance and operation of various park and recreation facilities and amenities. With the guidance of our Town Council and the support of our citizens, Parker’s Parks and Recreation Department has become one of the premier providers for park and recreation services in the state and winner of two Gold Medal awards (2000 and 2011) from the National Recreation and Parks Association. The mission for the Parker Parks and Recreation Department is “To provide quality parks and recreation facilities and services to meet the needs of our community by utilizing the resources of our team, and fostering an environment that encourages support, creativity, and integrity.”

Deni’s bio:

I am the daughter of Shawn and Kathy Jacobs, originally from a small town in Kansas where I grew up on a farm/ranch. After attending Garden City Community College for two years, I was recruited for a full scholarship to play basketball at Metropolitan State University in Denver Colorado. There I was awarded first team Academic All-District in recognition of outstanding accomplishments on the court and in the classroom. I was fortunate to be the first women’s basketball player in Metro State’s history to earn that honor. During my time at Metro I discovered Therapeutic Recreation (TR) and it aligned perfectly with my passion for helping others. After graduating with a Bachelors of Arts with a concentration in Therapeutic Recreation and passing the certification test, I was offered the Therapeutic/Senior Programs Coordinator position with the Town of Parker in December 2015. During my time with the Town of Parker I have added several new programs within TR including an Aquatic Therapy Program, Unified Kickball League, Buddy Bike Ride Program, a Bowling League and more. I have also been instrumental in the creation of new programs in the areas of chronic conditions. I am a very dedicated young professional whose main goal is to help the community thrive and provide outreach to underserved populations.

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Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at!


Upscale Purse Delivers Purses With a Purpose

Chris Bray, a fixture in Utah’s nonprofit community, has launched a social enterprise she hopes will power the rest of her career with still greater impact.

Chris recognized that nonprofits are always looking for more funding, especially from funding partners that understand their mission and objectives and will support them appropriately. She decided to become such a funder.

She created Upscale Purse, an online retailer that sells new and used high-quality purses and gives 10 percent to charity. The upstart is already breaking even and she’s excited to see it grow.

Watch the full interview with Chris in the player at the top of this article.

Chris is focusing on charities that serve and support women. “Women have tremendous barriers in their way and many have become victims of cruel and inhuman acts. One in three women will experience some form of domestic violence sometime in their life (Utah Women Stats, 2017).”

“In 2016, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children estimated that 1 in 6 endangered runaways reported to them were likely sex trafficking victims,” Chris continues. “The International Labor Organization estimates that there are 4.5 million people trapped in forced sexual exploitation globally. According to the Report, in the United States, the most common form of human trafficking (79%) is sexual exploitation. The victims are predominantly women and girls.”

“At Upscale Purse, our purpose is not only to provide an opportunity to purchase beautiful purses and handbags but also deliver funding to support women escaping crisis situations and offer them an opportunity for hope and a fulfilling life. A portion of the sale of every purse will be distributed to select nonprofit partners.”

Chris Bray, Upscale Purse

Chris Bray, Upscale Purse

More about Upscale Purse:

Upscale Purse combines fashion with purpose and sells beautiful, upscale purses then gives as least 10% to nonprofits working with disadvantaged women escaping domestic violence or human trafficking. These are purses with a purpose! Organized as a low-profit company, we make a measurable positive impact on women’s lives through the sale of purses, donations to carefully vetted nonprofits serving disadvantaged women and the volunteer experiences we create.Partners provide services that include mentoring, education and assistance escaping dangerous situations.

Chris’s bio:

I have served in the nonprofit community for over 30 years. I have worked at the CEO of Utah Nonprofits Association, Vice President of Collective Impact at United Way of Salt Lake, Executive Director of Children’s Service Society and The Sharing Place. My past work has centered mostly in nonprofit services impacting children but in the past few years, I have worked with more organizations focused on women’s challenges. Happy and balanced women are an important cornerstone of successful families and our communities. Many women have tremendous barriers in their way to achieve their goals and too many have become victims of cruel and inhuman acts. I decided to start a company that sales purses and invests in nonprofits addressing these barriers. Because of my background in collective impact strategies, this company will work with the nonprofits who achieve significant impact for the women they serve and are making a measurable community impact.

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Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at!


Breaking the Bad From My Pilgrimage to the Home of Walter White


This article was originally written for

Last weekend, Gail and I visited Albuquerque, New Mexico on a quest to visit shooting locations for the show Breaking Bad. We drove from our home in Salt Lake City and then all around the city. We also visited Farmington and Santa Fe. We had a great time despite putting 1,800 miles on our rented Ford Focus in four days. I was feeling rather guilty about the environmental impact of such a trip so I found a way to offset my carbon impact.

Gail and I sold our car almost three years ago. I wrote about our decision for Forbes. It is one of the most popular articles I’ve written and by far the most well remembered. People still frequently comment on our decision to sell our BMW SUV. One of our motivations for selling it was to be more environmentally friendly. So this long road trip with virtually no socially redeeming value left me feeling a bit guilty.

The home of fictional Breaking Bad character Walter White

The home of fictional Breaking Bad character Walter White

Recently, I wrote a Forbes piece about Cool Effect, a crowdfunding site that sells carbon credits. I figured it was about time I put what I learned into practice.

First, I had to determine how much carbon my trip produced. There are lots of calculators out there so I picked the first one that tickled my fancy with a quick Google search. With less than one minute of data entry, the calculator estimated that my trip produced 0.46 metric tonnes of carbon. Frankly, I was relieved that it was so little. There were times I thought I could feel sea-level rising as I passed slow-moving trucks going uphill.

Next, I visited where I was presented with about a dozen projects that all provide carbon offsets. Today, the prices offered for carbon offsets ranged from $6.04 per tonne to $13.18. Each project does something different to reduce carbon.

The cheapest carbon offset project is called “What’s Cooking?” It provides fuel efficient cookstoves in Uganda, reducing the carbon emissions from cooking there.  The ancillary benefits of this program include saving money for low-income households as they buy and burn less fuel, mostly charcoal. It also reduces deforestation there–charcoal is produced by partially burning wood. Perhaps most importantly, the project improves the health of women and children who spend time around cooking fires.

The most expensive project is called “Putting Methane in Its Place.” The project is located on the Southern Ute Indian reservation in La Plata County, Colorado. There, natural coal seams exposed to the atmosphere by erosion are leaking methane. The Tribe developed a way to capture and use the methane, preventing it from leaking into the atmosphere and allowing Tribe members to use the methane rather than purchasing propane or natural gas that had been drilled. The project also creates jobs for Tribe members.

For my carbon offset–I went all kinds of crazy and bought one entire tonne of carbon offset despite having generated only 0.46 tonnes–I chose “Wind Power to the People.” This project in Costa Rica provides wind power to 50,000 people in 10,000 households in rural Costa Rica. It also provides income to co-op owners in impoverished areas.

All of the projects have been triple checked and verified to assure investors that the carbon offsets they buy are real.  A typical American will generate between 16 and 20 tonnes of carbon per year. A household of four might produce 80 tonnes. Offsetting 100 percent of that carbon production would cost as little as $483.20 or just about $40 per month. While not universally true, there is a positive correlation with income and carbon production. Bigger homes produce more carbon. More cars driven more miles produce more carbon. Taking public transit dramatically reduces your carbon footprint. So does eating less meat! The bottom line is that for most households, offsetting their carbon production is now as cheap as it is easy. Try breaking your bad at CoolEffect.

Wringing Costs From Solar Is Goal For This Berkeley PhD

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Jason Trager is more than a throwback to the sixties or a cliche. He may have earned a PhD at Berkeley with a focus on improving the energy efficiency in buildings by applying statistical process controls, but he’s also a hard core entrepreneur who relishes profit–so long as it doesn’t adversely impact others.

He calls himself and his firm “Sustainabilist.” He says that unlike a capitalist who hordes profits and socializes externalities like pollution and carbon, a Sustainabilist hordes profits without socializing externalities. He says, “Our quest is carbon reduction. Every dollar that we make can be linked to some amount of carbon that does not make it into the atmosphere.”

Sustainabilist, the firm, is working on a number of projects, but one key area of focus is on applying statistical process controls to the process of solar installation. By doing so, he hopes to not only improve the quality of solar installations but also to reduce costs, thereby accelerating adoption.

Jason explains, “The same statistics and operational frameworks that are used to mass-produce cars, pens, beer, and soda cans can be used to detect and minimize problems with solar installations and building operations.”

He notes that the soft costs of solar installations are especially challenging. “Through our methodology, we have been able to use data to pick out issues with contractor installation techniques. If we can improve the process of the installation of solar, we can potentially eliminate an estimated $181 million in expense that it costs contractors to go back to sites in order to fix problems,” he concludes.

Sustainabilist is also working on a platform called RosettaBlock that employs open-source standards to close the feedback loop between contractors, building owners and operators and the solar manufacturers. He hopes this feedback loop can help further reduce the cost of solar.

With his focus on the environment and sustainability, Jason lives up to the Berkeley reputation. His entrepreneurial drive may allow him to accelerate solar adoption to the benefit of everyone on the planet.

Jason Trager, courtesy of Sustainabilist

Jason Trager, courtesy of Sustainabilist

More about Sustainabilist:

Twitter: @sustainabilist

We provide contracting and consulting services to sustainable businesses and companies that wish to be more sustainable. Our specialities are: quality for solar and energy efficiency control through data science, marketing and communications for sustainable enterprises, and corporate social responsibility for the enterprise. We are also producing SaaS products for social good, such as RosettaBlock and the PlusFarm urban farming controller that we are producing in collaboration with Blue Planet Consulting and CommonGarden.

Jason’s bio:

Dr. Trager is an engineer and sustainability professional with experience in utilizing data to drive profitable results while simultaneously reducing the carbon footprint of businesses. Through his company, Sustainabilist, he demonstrates his passion for building technically sound businesses that reduce the rate of anthropogenic climate change. He earned a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, where he studied the application of statistical process control (SPC) and other mass production methodologies for energy efficiency in buildings. His program also included a designated emphasis in energy science and technology in addition to a certificate in Engineering and Business for Sustainability. He has since focused on applying SPC frameworks to improve the quality of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects with groups such as the Institute for Building Safety and Technology (IBTS), and kW Engineering.

Jason is the founder of Sustainabilist, a personalized political philosophy which guides the company. He believes that being a Sustainabilist is like being a capitalist, but that you are not obligated to maximise profit at expense of all else. Instead, the obligation is to internalize and minimize the negative externalities created by your business. It is acceptable to maximise profit as a Sustainabilist, but the previously given constraint must be satisfied at all times.

Jason’s areas of experience include business development, energy data science, product life cycle assessment, scientific coding, fundraising, team management, and bicycle repair. He is a serial entrepreneur who has been a key founder in three companies. Jason values teamwork and diversity on projects. He is committed to living by sustainable values and is always willing to have a discussion about how to improve the world.

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Devin is a journalist, author and corporate social responsibility speaker who calls himself a champion of social good. With a goal to help solve some of the world’s biggest problems by 2045, he focuses on telling the stories of those who are leading the way! Learn more at!


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